Networks

Lab seeks partners for Network Mapping System

Placeholder Image for Article Template

One of the country's top high-performance computing labs is turning to private industry to license a powerful network analysis tool it developed.

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is offering companies the opportunity to collaborate on its Network Mapping System (NeMS) with the potential to license intellectual property rights, develop pilot programs and commercialize the system, according to a notice posted on FedBizOpps on Nov. 25.

Cloud computing, virtualization, and the growing use of wireless and mobile devices are making networks more complex and creating bigger targets for electronic threats. The risks to increasingly vulnerable IT operations have spurred heavy investment in security staff and technologies to identify, analyze and protect computing infrastructures. Officials at Lawrence Livermore say network mapping can give IT managers more specific information to help them monitor and protect networks.

Celeste Matarazzo, a cybersecurity researcher at the lab's Center for Applied Scientific Computing, told FCW that the Department of Homeland Security has been seeking backing for the tool from technology companies and financial institutions. DHS is using NeMS for its Continuous Diagnostics and Mitigation program for fortifying computer networks and systems.

NeMS will be one of the emerging technologies spotlighted during the DHS Cyber Security Division's Transition to Practice for Investors, Integrators and IT Companies event in Washington on Dec. 18.

Matarazzo said NeMS can help users gain insight into their networks without extensive preparation and without compromising the security of a mapped network. It is a software-based network characterization and discovery tool that constructs visual representations of networks based on observed behavior. It uses active mapping, passive network traffic analysis and host discovery techniques to characterize the network environment.

Previously known as Net Mapper, NeMS harnesses Lawrence Livermore's Everest visualization system to analyze networks. NeMS and Everest can be used separately for specific applications, but when strapped together, they can provide continuing network situational awareness, lab officials say.

One of NeMS' strengths is a flexible architecture that allows deployment in a wide variety of customer-specific applications, Matarazzo said. NeMS was developed in the lab's high-performance computing environment, but it is scalable to work in almost any environment.

"It can be dialed from 0 to 11, depending on the user's needs," she said.

About the Author

Mark Rockwell is a staff writer covering acquisition, procurement and homeland security. Contact him at mrockwell@fcw.com or follow him on Twitter at @MRockwell4.

The 2015 Federal 100

Meet 100 women and men who are doing great things in federal IT.

Featured

  • Shutterstock image (by venimo): e-learning concept image, digital content and online webinar icons.

    Can MOOCs make the grade for federal training?

    Massive open online courses can offer specialized IT instruction on a flexible schedule and on the cheap. That may not always mesh with government's preference for structure and certification, however.

  • Shutterstock image (by edel): graduation cap and diploma.

    Cybersecurity: 6 schools with the right stuff

    The federal government craves more cybersecurity professionals. These six schools are helping meet that demand.

  • Rick Holgate

    Holgate to depart ATF

    Former ACT president will take a job with Gartner, follow his spouse to Vienna, Austria.

  • Are VA techies slacking off on Yammer?

    A new IG report cites security and productivity concerns associated with employees' use of the popular online collaboration tool.

  • Shutterstock image: digital fingerprint, cyber crime.

    Exclusive: The OPM breach details you haven't seen

    An official timeline of the Office of Personnel Management breach obtained by FCW pinpoints the hackers’ calibrated extraction of data, and the government's step-by-step response.

  • Stephen Warren

    Deputy CIO Warren exits VA

    The onetime acting CIO at Veterans Affairs will be taking over CIO duties at the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency.

  • Shutterstock image: monitoring factors of healthcare.

    DOD awards massive health records contract

    Leidos, Accenture and Cerner pull off an unexpected win of the multi-billion-dollar Defense Healthcare Management System Modernization contract, beating out the presumptive health-records leader.

  • Sweating the OPM data breach -- Illustration by Dragutin Cvijanovic

    Sweating the stolen data

    Millions of background-check records were compromised, OPM now says. Here's the jaw-dropping range of personal data that was exposed.

  • FCW magazine

    Let's talk about Alliant 2

    The General Services Administration is going to great lengths to gather feedback on its IT services GWAC. Will it make for a better acquisition vehicle?

Reader comments

Thu, Dec 5, 2013

Does it ship the results directly back to NSA, or is that a feature to be added later?

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above