Networks

Time to raise networking expectations in government

computer network

Greg Bell, division director of the Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) at the Energy Department, has a message for federal agencies: Networking matters.

ESnet, the first 100 gigabit-per-second network at a continental scale, connects 40 labs and facilities and more than 100 total networks. In science terms, Bell said “faster data leads to faster discovery.” In federal agencies, faster data translates to “better fulfillment of mission” and a more positive experience for end-users using myriad applications.

Bell suggested agencies step away from the old method of data transport, which he described as “a hard drive system plus FedEx.” For most situations, that physical method of transfer – still common in government – almost always equates to a loss in efficiency.

“If you have a workflow that involves sharing data, combining or allowing others to access data, you don’t want FedEx,” said Bell, speaking at a briefing in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 20.

Bell then suggested a data transfer rate agencies should be able to meet.

“Can your users move one terabyte in an hour?” Bell said. “If not, please raise their expectations.”

Common problems like “naively configured firewalls, lossy networks” – things like poor cabling, for example – and poorly configured end-systems hinder network speed. These kinds of problems are a much simpler fix than alternatives such as costly improvements to the physical network.

ESnet is a unique use case among networks. It has transferred tens of petabytes of scientific information from behemoth science facilities like the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland, since 1990 using increasingly fast physical networks optimized for “massive science data flows,” Bell said.

ESnet is exploring the possibility of a prototype 400 gigabit-per-second network, and believes the scientific side of government is likely to see networks faster than 100 gigabits-per-second within the next 18 months.

Most civilian agencies do not yet require the kinds of network speeds that transfer science data to and from disparate supercomputing facilities, but data is growing at an exponential rate. The flood of data is going to require better networks in government, the largest data producer in the world.

“In the old world, we built business on what your network could do,” said Stephen Alexander, senior vice president and CTO of Ciena. “What we want to get to now is that whatever business you’re running, the network is responsive to it. The network is far more dynamic, far more real-time. It is time for the network to step up with compute and storage to build a better machine. And the machine needs to be infrastructure.”

Such a fundamental architectural change is “going to take some years to happen,” Alexander said. But it will happen, and the government will have to adapt or be left behind in a bottleneck. 

About the Author

Frank Konkel is a former staff writer for FCW.

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Reader comments

Sat, Feb 22, 2014 Robert

I'll second that. It's gotten so bad that even using resources within our own LAN is spotty at best. We won't even talk about trying to move data out of our LAN. The pile of firewalls, overly complicated access lists on routers in between, and YouTube saturated pipes make it impossible to do anything via the WAN. We even have trouble pulling Google these days. There answer? Buy more off brand equipment to put on the LAN to cause more latency and blocks; meanwhile still allowing YouTube to saturate a pipe meant for 200 people, yet serving 4000. Total failure.

Fri, Feb 21, 2014

This is impossible at our Agency they keep building enclaves, which are like isolate islands compartmentalized to the point of total dysfunction. It would take a year and a day, if at all, to get any a viable connection to anywhere. Many usable web site get filtered by generalized keywords, and it takes a pile of rarely successful administratium to get access, (can one say sneakernet; security inaction). To sum it up we suffer from a malignant form of urethral stricture. Good luck with this—it’s a Callahan full-bore auto-lock.

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