The Circuit


ACT-IAC elects new leadership

One of the area’s largest government IT industry groups will see some new faces starting July 1 when a brand-new leadership is slated to take office.

The American Council for Technology and Industry Advisory Council announced on June 5 the election results for the ACT Executive Committee and the IAC Executive Committee at Management of Change conference in Cambridge, Md.

Darren Ash, CIO at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, will become ACT president July 1, 2012, and Rick Holgate, CIO at the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, will serve as executive vice president. He'll step into his role as ACT president July 1, 2013.

New to the ACT Executive Committee are Mike Howell, Amy Northcutt and Keith Trippie. Current members re-elected for a second term include Jonathan Alboum, Steve Elky, Margie Janney and John Teeter. They join current members Deborah Diaz, Adrian Gardner, Darlene Meskell, Rory Schultz, Pete Tseronis and Kathleen Turco.

Current ACT President Mary Davie remains on the executive committee as immediate past president.

In accordance with the IAC bylaws, Dale Luddeke (TASC) becomes IAC chair July 1, 2012. Jim Williams (Daon) was elected as executive vice chair and will become the IAC chair July 1, 2013. Bob Suda (Suda and Associates) was elected as vice chair for finance while Judy Douglas (HP), Sherry Weir (Kearney & Company), Dan Chenok (IBM) and Mitzi Mead (Accela Consulting) were chosen as vice chairs at large.

Remaining on the IAC Executive Committee are Vice Chairs at Large Wayne Davis (CenturyLink), Ira Hobbs (Hobbs & Hobbs), Joel Horwitz (VMD Systems Integrators), Carol Miller (Mackson Consulting), Andrew McLauchlin (CGI) and Mike Mullen (Deep Water Point). Outgoing IAC Chair Jim Beaupre (JB Federal Consulting) stays on the Executive Committee until 2013 as immediate past chair.

Executive Committee members Kathleen Cowles (LGS Innovations), Ed Meagher (SRA), John Okay (J.L. Okay Consulting), and Jeff Shen (Red Team Consulting) have now completed their terms. 

Posted by Camille Tuutti on Jun 05, 2012 at 12:11 PM0 comments


Federal IT community supports Children's Inn

The federal IT community raised what could fairly be described as a ton of money for the Children's Inn at the annual gala held April 14. Children's Inn is a residential facility for sick children and their families to stay in while receiving experimental treatments at the National Institutes of Health.

"Great day today," wrote Robert Guerra on Facebook early on the morning of May 24. "At 7:30, we will present the CEO of the Children's Inn with a check for $838,000 as a result of our Gala of April 14th. Great to help those thousands of children and families at their home away from home. Thanks to all for their incredible generosity."

AFCEA's Bethesda chapter hosts the annual gala for the Inn, and Guerra, a consultant and partner at Guerra, Kiviat, is chairman for the gala.

(It's actually only almost a ton. Based on some research that revealed the weight of a dollar bill is 1 gram, we calculated that 838,000 $1 bills would weigh 1,846 pounds ... just shy of a ton.)

Posted on May 24, 2012 at 12:11 PM0 comments


VanRoekel's choice of hosiery draws attention

US CIO Steve VanRoekel is doing things differently these days, and he knows it takes more than fresh technology to be really fresh. It takes a change of clothes.

VanRoekel and US CTO Todd Park spoke May 23 to the new-age IT crowd at the TechCrunch Disrupt NYC Conference about President Barack Obama’s new digital strategy. In the strategy, the administration aims to make the government innovative and mobile to meet the demands of today’s citizenry.

Coming straight from Washington, VanRoekel has a persona to overcome. The crowd VanRoekel addressed in New York is very different from that in Washington. These people typically choose to wear a pair of jeans to work instead of stuffy dark suits. So for his presentation, VanRoekel dumped his tie, wore his shirt with the top buttons undone and put on white socks with pink stripes that contrasted against his dark slacks and shoes.

His reason for his fresh clothes:

“To change culture, you’ve got to switch things up, and this is about changing culture, in large part.”

He testifies on the digital strategy before the Senate committee May 24. Will he change culture on Capitol Hill with those white, striped socks?

Posted by Matthew Weigelt on May 23, 2012 at 12:11 PM1 comments