The Circuit


Two take top honors for service at Management of Change conference

Federal Deputy CIO Lisa Schlosser has joined a distinguished group of government leaders who have been recognized for their longstanding commitment and dedication to public service.

Schlosser and John Okay, vice president of  of J. L. Okay Consulting and IAC vice chair for finance, were honored June 4 at the 32nd annual Management of Change conference in Cambridge, Md. The event is organized by the American Council for Technology and Industry Advisory Council and is held June 3 to 5.

In previous years, only one winner has been given the John J. Franke Award. This year, however, two individuals were recognized for their significant contributions to federal service.

Mary Davie, assistant commissioner for the Office of Integrated Technology Services at the General Services Administration and ACT president, described the winners as ones who typically don’t make the headlines but instead work tirelessly behind the scenes to make the government better.

“This year, we have chosen to recognize two such individuals: John and Lisa exemplify the best of our profession and we are proud to recognize them with the 2012 John J. Franke Award,” she said.

Schlosser was appointed to her current role in 2011, having previously served in positions at the Environmental Protection Agency, the Housing and Urban Development, and the Transportation Department. Her private-sector experience includes stints at Global Integrity and Ernst & Young LLP.

Okay’s government career spans three decades and includes roles at the Agriculture Department, and GSA. Before retiring in 1997, Okay served as deputy commissioner of GSA’s Federal Technology Service. Two years later, he founded his own consulting business and partnered with Bob Woods, former FTS commissioner to launch Topside Consulting Group. He’s an active member of IAC and has chaired the Telecommunications Shared Interest Group.
 
The most recent years’ Franke Award winners include Roger Baker, CIO at the Veteran Affairs Department, Jim Williams, commissioner for GSA’s Federal Acquisition Service and John Johnson, former assistant commissioner for GSA’s Integrated Acquisition Service.

Posted by FCW Staff on Jun 05, 2012 at 12:11 PM0 comments


Federal IT community supports Children's Inn

The federal IT community raised what could fairly be described as a ton of money for the Children's Inn at the annual gala held April 14. Children's Inn is a residential facility for sick children and their families to stay in while receiving experimental treatments at the National Institutes of Health.

"Great day today," wrote Robert Guerra on Facebook early on the morning of May 24. "At 7:30, we will present the CEO of the Children's Inn with a check for $838,000 as a result of our Gala of April 14th. Great to help those thousands of children and families at their home away from home. Thanks to all for their incredible generosity."

AFCEA's Bethesda chapter hosts the annual gala for the Inn, and Guerra, a consultant and partner at Guerra, Kiviat, is chairman for the gala.

(It's actually only almost a ton. Based on some research that revealed the weight of a dollar bill is 1 gram, we calculated that 838,000 $1 bills would weigh 1,846 pounds ... just shy of a ton.)

Posted on May 24, 2012 at 12:11 PM0 comments


VanRoekel's choice of hosiery draws attention

US CIO Steve VanRoekel is doing things differently these days, and he knows it takes more than fresh technology to be really fresh. It takes a change of clothes.

VanRoekel and US CTO Todd Park spoke May 23 to the new-age IT crowd at the TechCrunch Disrupt NYC Conference about President Barack Obama’s new digital strategy. In the strategy, the administration aims to make the government innovative and mobile to meet the demands of today’s citizenry.

Coming straight from Washington, VanRoekel has a persona to overcome. The crowd VanRoekel addressed in New York is very different from that in Washington. These people typically choose to wear a pair of jeans to work instead of stuffy dark suits. So for his presentation, VanRoekel dumped his tie, wore his shirt with the top buttons undone and put on white socks with pink stripes that contrasted against his dark slacks and shoes.

His reason for his fresh clothes:

“To change culture, you’ve got to switch things up, and this is about changing culture, in large part.”

He testifies on the digital strategy before the Senate committee May 24. Will he change culture on Capitol Hill with those white, striped socks?

Posted by Matthew Weigelt on May 23, 2012 at 12:11 PM1 comments