The Pipeline

Just like peaches and cream

Peaches taste good alone, and so does cream. And together they’re a winning combination, like the latest product from Apere. The company has created a network security device that offers identity management and information access in a single security appliance.

Apere calls the product the Identity Managed Access Gateway, or IMAG. The target market is workgroups within large organizations. IMAG consolidates user identities into a central location and controls who has permission to access what.

Mike Miller, director of strategic partnerships at Apere, said 95 percent of security boils down to two questions: Are you who you say you are? And if you are, are you doing what you’re supposed to be doing?

IMAG can help answer both questions. It’s nonintrusive, meaning that an agency does not have to change its policies to install it. “Other products such as Tivoli and NetIQ are intrusive and policy-changing,” Miller said. “They have to change the way they do business in order to use the product.”

The Identity Management Access Solution permits or denies network access based on policies automatically created from identity access information contained throughout the enterprise. Administrators don’t need to manually create policies.

Many organizations store identity access information in different locations, but once they install IMAG, it integrates the information into one universal identity reference. Then the product can create and manage access policies.

Another useful IMAG function is its ability to help agencies comply with regulations. “We’re the central point to go to for regulatory compliance information,” Miller said.

Think of IMAG as an identity firewall that allows access to the network based on identity information. And think of peaches and cream as the perfect hot-weather dish.

Bigger, bulkier and mobile

As cameras, mobile phones and computer chips get smaller, LCD monitors seem to get bigger. That’s a good thing, except when you need to move them to different locations.

Large flat-panel monitors are great for presentations, teleconferences and signs at events. But you wouldn’t want to have to pay a small army to move them.

That’s where the new Rotolift from Jelco comes in. It’s a mobile cabinet that can transport, display and store LCD monitors measuring as big as 50 inches diagonally. It’s an all-in-one mobile cabinet that can display large flat-panel LCDs and plasma monitors in either portrait or landscape orientation.

One person can set up a monitor display with the Rotolift because it easily rolls into place. A counterbalanced mechanism allows the operator to raise and lower the monitor for uses ranging from a conference table setup to a presentation for a large group.

Afterward, you can securely store the monitor inside the cabinet.

The Rotolift’s shipping case is 63 inches high, 35 inches wide and 19 inches deep. It comes with optional shelves and brackets and can house computers or wireless components.

The Jelco Rotolift has a suggested price of $3,695. It has a one-year warranty. Custom finished cases and an optional drapery kit are also available.

The 2015 Federal 100

Meet 100 women and men who are doing great things in federal IT.

Featured

  • Shutterstock image (by venimo): e-learning concept image, digital content and online webinar icons.

    Can MOOCs make the grade for federal training?

    Massive open online courses can offer specialized IT instruction on a flexible schedule and on the cheap. That may not always mesh with government's preference for structure and certification, however.

  • Shutterstock image (by edel): graduation cap and diploma.

    Cybersecurity: 6 schools with the right stuff

    The federal government craves more cybersecurity professionals. These six schools are helping meet that demand.

  • Rick Holgate

    Holgate to depart ATF

    Former ACT president will take a job with Gartner, follow his spouse to Vienna, Austria.

  • Are VA techies slacking off on Yammer?

    A new IG report cites security and productivity concerns associated with employees' use of the popular online collaboration tool.

  • Shutterstock image: digital fingerprint, cyber crime.

    Exclusive: The OPM breach details you haven't seen

    An official timeline of the Office of Personnel Management breach obtained by FCW pinpoints the hackers’ calibrated extraction of data, and the government's step-by-step response.

  • Stephen Warren

    Deputy CIO Warren exits VA

    The onetime acting CIO at Veterans Affairs will be taking over CIO duties at the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency.

  • Shutterstock image: monitoring factors of healthcare.

    DOD awards massive health records contract

    Leidos, Accenture and Cerner pull off an unexpected win of the multi-billion-dollar Defense Healthcare Management System Modernization contract, beating out the presumptive health-records leader.

  • Sweating the OPM data breach -- Illustration by Dragutin Cvijanovic

    Sweating the stolen data

    Millions of background-check records were compromised, OPM now says. Here's the jaw-dropping range of personal data that was exposed.

  • FCW magazine

    Let's talk about Alliant 2

    The General Services Administration is going to great lengths to gather feedback on its IT services GWAC. Will it make for a better acquisition vehicle?

Reader comments

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above