Is data center consolidation worth the bother?

The deadline is approaching for agencies to submit their data center consolidation plans, and Federal CIO Vivek Kundra is playing it up. In a Federal Computer Week article by Rutrell Yasin, Kundra said that when the plans are published on Oct. 7, people will see that the reports are the "golden source of data around cost savings, around every data center that agencies own [and] a very specific road map for which data centers will be shut down by 2015."

However, not everyone is as enthusiastic as Kundra. Derrick Harris, writing at GigaOM, reports that data center consolidation might not be easy.

Harris’ article, like many others on the topic, is pegged to a MeriTalk survey that revealed widespread skepticism among federal IT managers about the value or feasibility of consolidation. But Harris learned from a Juniper Networks representative that one perceived problem is the proliferation of custom-coded applications in the federal data center infrastructure. The presence of such apps makes consolidating data centers impractical until some apps are rewritten or replaced with standard ones, the Juniper rep told Harris.

But other information has emerged that could validate Kundra's plans. A critical reason to consolidate data centers is to reduce power consumption, based on the relatively obvious principle that fewer servers in fewer buildings require less electricity.

Damon Poeter, writing at PCMag.com, reports that the growth of data center power consumption has been far less than experts believed it would be. Power consumption by data centers worldwide doubled from 2000 to 2005 but grew by only 56 percent from 2005 to 2010, according to a study by Jonathan Koomey, an associate professor at Stanford University’s Woods Institute for the Environment.

Koomey cited several reasons why the growth in power consumption has slowed. They include data center consolidation and increased use of server virtualization, which would seem to suggest that the Obama administration is on the right track.

About the Author

Technology journalist Michael Hardy is a former FCW editor.

The 2015 Federal 100

Meet 100 women and men who are doing great things in federal IT.

Featured

  • Shutterstock image (by venimo): e-learning concept image, digital content and online webinar icons.

    Can MOOCs make the grade for federal training?

    Massive open online courses can offer specialized IT instruction on a flexible schedule and on the cheap. That may not always mesh with government's preference for structure and certification, however.

  • Shutterstock image (by edel): graduation cap and diploma.

    Cybersecurity: 6 schools with the right stuff

    The federal government craves more cybersecurity professionals. These six schools are helping meet that demand.

  • Rick Holgate

    Holgate to depart ATF

    Former ACT president will take a job with Gartner, follow his spouse to Vienna, Austria.

  • Are VA techies slacking off on Yammer?

    A new IG report cites security and productivity concerns associated with employees' use of the popular online collaboration tool.

  • Shutterstock image: digital fingerprint, cyber crime.

    Exclusive: The OPM breach details you haven't seen

    An official timeline of the Office of Personnel Management breach obtained by FCW pinpoints the hackers’ calibrated extraction of data, and the government's step-by-step response.

  • Stephen Warren

    Deputy CIO Warren exits VA

    The onetime acting CIO at Veterans Affairs will be taking over CIO duties at the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency.

  • Shutterstock image: monitoring factors of healthcare.

    DOD awards massive health records contract

    Leidos, Accenture and Cerner pull off an unexpected win of the multi-billion-dollar Defense Healthcare Management System Modernization contract, beating out the presumptive health-records leader.

  • Sweating the OPM data breach -- Illustration by Dragutin Cvijanovic

    Sweating the stolen data

    Millions of background-check records were compromised, OPM now says. Here's the jaw-dropping range of personal data that was exposed.

  • FCW magazine

    Let's talk about Alliant 2

    The General Services Administration is going to great lengths to gather feedback on its IT services GWAC. Will it make for a better acquisition vehicle?

Reader comments

Mon, Aug 15, 2011 Bryan Indianapolis

Having the DoD Data Center can be a great positive if the NSA shares its computer and data protection technology and there is cooperation among the co-located super agencies. That alone is a cost savings that can be captured above the original master plan.

Tue, Aug 9, 2011

Yes, move the US data to the cloud so foreign national spies can work as low cost techies. We save power costs and labor costs. We lose confidentiality and oversight but hey those are the risks. Just because availabilty is one part of the security triad, doesn't mean clouds are providing more security. Your biggest threat to your information is the inside threat. In a cloud, you no longer have control over the data or the infrastructure. Oh but there is identity management. All an insider has to do is backup or split the data feed and send it to another system. So what they get fined if they are breeched? We're talking about highly sensitive government information that can be manipulated for massive profit or involve people's lives. The commercial banks are breeched all the time. Cyber security is about having many layers of protection which cost money. Commercial entities are about limiting the layers to make a profit.

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above