Senate rejects funding bill, shutdown nears

The Senate has rejected a temporary funding bill that the House had passed in the early-morning hours of Sept. 23. The Senate vote leaves the prospect of a government shutdown alive.

The Democratic-led Senate voted 59 to 36 to reject the House-approved bill that would provide funding to disaster-relief efforts and keep the federal government funded through Nov. 18. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nevada) has scheduled a Sept. 26 vote on the spending measure. He wants lawmakers to "cool off" over the weekend, according to a report in The Hill,

“The leaders ... should just cool off a little bit,” he said. “Work through this. There is a compromise here...Everyone once in a while needs a little cooling-off period.” Congress will be in recess for most of next week.

Disaster funding usually draws bipartisan support, but this year Republican leaders are adamant that any supplemental emergency funds be offset by other spending cuts, the Los Angeles Times reported.

In a statement Sept. 22, Reid called the House continuing resolution "not an honest effort at compromise"

Rather, the bill "fails to provide the relief that our fellow Americans need as they struggle to rebuild their lives in the wake of floods, wildfires and hurricanes, and it will be rejected by the Senate," he said.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency could run out of money as early as Sept. 26, Reid said, resulting in relief funds getting “tied up in partisan gridlock.”

The House-approved legislation that passed in the early hours of Sept. 23 would fund the government through Nov. 18 and allocates $3.65 billion to FEMA.

 

About the Author

Camille Tuutti is a former FCW staff writer who covered federal oversight and the workforce.

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Reader comments

Tue, Sep 27, 2011 -B

"Recess" is a court room reference.I think Roberts Rules of Order should be available as a free e-book for download somewhere.

Tue, Sep 27, 2011 -B

If the Executive takes time off without meeting its most basic job requirement (funding the government they have created) then they should do so without pay. A "shutdown" should be across the board and affect all "public servents". If that were to be the case, I suspect they'd be more motivated to meet their deadlines.

Mon, Sep 26, 2011 Mike

Awesome statement(s) by David! Exactly. Kindergarten!

Mon, Sep 26, 2011 testpilot DC

Congress is taking $150M per year for their salaries. There is too much representation for them to get anything done and no accountability. Senators and Congressmen are spending another $1B per year on staff and office expenses. ___Look who really needs to be furloughed!

Mon, Sep 26, 2011 David

I don't understand them getting a recess. They haven't done enough to have a vacation. And why is it called recess versus vacation. What are they in kindergarten?

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