Government Shutdown

Shutdown begins

capitol dome

The White House issued instructions to agency heads to begin to shut down non-essential government operations and furlough federal workers as the last hours of fiscal year 2013 ticked away.

A memo from Sylvia Burwell, Director of the Office of Management and Budget, told agencies to "execute plans for an orderly shutdown due to the absence of appropriations." It is the first shutdown since 1996, and one of a number of shutdowns over budget stalemates that have occurred during periods of divided government dating back to the Reagan presidency.

The news came as the House of Representatives was in the midst of passing a bill to appoint a conference committee to strike a deal on the budget. As the plan was being discussed in a late-night meeting of the House Rules Committee, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) indicated that such a motion would be tabled until the House agreed to a six-week continuing resolution to fund the government with no policy riders altering or delaying the scheduled implementation of the Affordable Care Act.

Before the House vote on the conference committee, that chamber had passed several versions of a continuing resolution to remove funding for the ACA, delay the Oct. 1 launch of open enrollment, delay the requirement that individuals carry health insurance, and eliminate premium support for members of Congress and staffers as well as the president, vice president and top executive branch appointees. All of these were batted away by the Senate in a series of party-line votes.

The Office of Personnel Management released detailed guidance for employees that delves into the minutiae of federal employment, such as how to get approval for outside work during a furlough, and what happens to feds who are on temporary details.

Federal workers will continue to be covered by the Federal Employee Health Benefits plan during a shutdown furlough. Their share of the premiums will be deducted from their paychecks when they return to work. There's no guarantee that federal employees will receive back pay for the furlough period -- Congress must authorize it.  Rep. Gerry Connolly (D-Va.) announced on Twitter that he was going to co-sponsor legislation along with Rep. Jim Moran (D-Va.) to secure retroactive pay for furloughed workers.

Furloughed feds will get paid for the four hours or so they are required to put in on Oct. 1 to prepare for a shutdown, per OMB guidance.

It's not clear what path the debate will take next. Legislators will soon grapple with an extension of the debt ceiling. It's possible that a resolution of the shutdown could be folded into a plan to avert a default on government payments that could occur as soon as Oct. 17, by Treasury estimates.

About the Author

Adam Mazmanian is a staff writer covering Congress, the FCC and other key agencies. Connect with him on Twitter: @thisismaz.

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Reader comments

Thu, Oct 3, 2013 RayW

Interesting, the House is supposedly trying to get spending bills passed by sending each one separately to the Senate, but apparently the Senate is supposedly refusing to accept any bill unless it is the aggregate including the "Obama bill funding". But the Republicans are still being blamed for not funding the Government?

Of course, this information comes from biased media, on both sides.

Wed, Oct 2, 2013 A. J. Jones

Let's face it. The Republican Party wants to castrate the President any way they can. If the issue wasn't heath care they would pick on climate change. Members of the House need to tell the T-Party to grow up and act like Americans not hurt members of a minority faction.

Tue, Oct 1, 2013

I worked for the Department of Defense for thirty nine years and went through several shut downs. I have never seen such inhumane people running the White house. They only care about them selves. What is needed is adult leadership. What we have now is spoiled brats running the country.

Tue, Oct 1, 2013

This article is so one sided. Where are the Republican comments? Of course the Democrats should give Federal worker pay for the furloughed time. It's their fault anyway. Obamcare needs to go along with so much more we don't have the money to pay. Borrowing with no repayment plan (aka income) only puts us further in debt. Republicans need to hold out on this because if they do and the debt ceiling doesn't get raised. We defaulting will be the best thing to happen to this country in a long time. That will finally kill Obamacare and all the entitlements most shouldn't be getting in the first place. I work hard for what I make not to pay some lazy person who is able but unwilling to work. Work and you eat. Don't and you starve. Its the way the animal kingdom stays balanced. Give a helping hand to someone who needs help but not for their entire life unless they are physically unable to walk and confined to a wheel chair. The rest of you get to work and stop crying about the splinter in your finger.

Tue, Oct 1, 2013 OccupyIT

What a shame our Representatives have no honor or sense of duty to actually govern and instead spend all their time preening and posturing like Cock-of-the-Rocks (censors: its an actual bird). It dishonors the service of both direct hires and the contractors that work so hard to back things just a little better each day. GS'ers - please remember what it feels like when next you sit on a mod or award or bicker amongst yourselves - this is what contractors feel every year. Contractors - please the clown car parked on Capitol Hill and keep the faith. Our country needs you both more and more every day. Good luck and see you on the other side!

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