Gov Careers

By Phil Piemonte

Blog archive

Postal worlds collide

There’s bound to be some talk going on in post offices across the country — for two reasons.

First, there’s the U.S. Postal Service’s quarterly report.

Given the economic and financial pressures on the Postal Service (retiree health care prefunding requirement, declining mail volume, etc.), financial reports that reveal more losses are no surprise these days.

Those factors continue to plague USPS “despite a reduction of over 130,000 full-time equivalents (FTEs) in the last three years,” as USPS CFO and Executive Vice President Joseph Corbett said in a statement accompanying the most recent financial report this week. According to the Postal Service, USPS reduced work hours in the second quarter by 9.6 million hours — or 3.2 percent — and trimmed 6,726 employees from its rolls during the second quarter.

However, there’s that second thing ...

In what could only be called bad timing (or good timing, depending on one’s perspective), across town from USPS' headquarters, a Washington Post blogger was calling attention to the fact that the salaries of top USPS officials now are available on a database run by Gannett Newspapers.

For example, the salary of Postmaster General and CEO Patrick Donahoe, according to that blog post, will end up somewhere north of $276,000 this year “before deferred compensation, performance bonuses and pension payments.” The blog also cites a number of other top USPS salaries.

Donahoe oversees an operation with well over a half million employees, so in the business world, that would be small potatoes compared to the salaries of CEOs of other large enterprises.

Just the same, we doubt that fact will mean much to postal workers whose departures have done little to ease problems with the Postal Service’s bottom line.

Comments, postal employees?

Posted by Phil Piemonte on May 11, 2011 at 12:13 PM


Reader comments

Tue, Mar 27, 2012 val nostdahl

The post master general new increased salary was part of a povision of the postal accountiblity and enhancement act in 2006, at that time potter got a raise of 40 % of $72,000 , and other top exec including the currant pmg got a raise as well, the idea is to attract top mangment you must give top pay, or in this case extra money to undercut staff and services. Congress passed the paea with a voice vote, and the whole issue of the paea is based on the overfunding of the retirement funds of craft federal employees with the civil service retirement fund being overfunded ( and denied by leading gop oversight commitee members who also are lobbyied by those with vested interest to privitzie the usps) by 55 billion and fedearal employee retirementservice by 7 to 11 billion, the act ws intruoduced and passed in 2006, meanwhie offices were understaffed, how do I know , my spouse had this coming down the line for his workload trippled, and forced to be one and only for almost a year then died. The plan is take the retirment monies and understaff and keep the overcharge , cash cow of the usps.Its giving to the higher up , enriching them and making the craft workers do more for same salary or less, tyrhng to replace them with non benifits and lower pay. Meanwhile givng plenty of money at top. My spouse worked for 17 years and then could not get help and is gone, many others have also passed too young due to this extreme mentality of deconstruct a consitutional madated business.

Tue, Nov 8, 2011 PATricia Cress

I ALSO DID A SEARCH OF POSTMASTER GENERAL SALARY BECAUSE I WAS TOLD IT WAS $800,000. HE IS ONE OF TOP 10 HIGHEST PAID GOV'T WORKERS. I FOUND APPROX. $250.000. UNTIL YOU LOOK AT INCENTIVES. THEN IT WENT UP, ON ANOTHER FINANCIAL SHEET TO $400,000 PLUS. THERE MAY BE MORE. FOR POTTER IN 2007, THERE WAS TO BE NO INCENTIVES, YET IT WAS HIDDEN UNTIL RETIREMENT. DONAHUE HAS $3.2MILLION IN RETIREMENT FINANCIAL STATEMENT. MORE COULD BE HIDDEN UNTIL HE LEAVES. THIS IS NOT INCLUDING ALL THE PERKS FROM BEING WINED AND DINED BY THOSE WANTING TO DESTROY THE P.O. I WOULD GLADLY GIVE HIM A SMALL BONUS TO LEAVE THE P.O. WE REALLY NEED SOMEONE WHO REALLY CARES ABOUT SERVICE TO THE AMERICAN PEOPLE. INSTEAD OF "CUT CUT CUT" WE WANT SOMEONE WITH CREATIVE IDEAS TO GENERATE REVENUE OR AT LEAST TAKE CARE OF THE BUSINESS WE ALREADY HAVE. WE WOULD HAVE MORE REVENUE, ESPECIALLY PARCEL BUSINESS, IF THEY WOULD STAFF RETAIL UNITS FOR THE CONVENIENCE OF THE CUSTOMER. SERVICE INDUSTRY MEANS SERVICING, NOT UNDERSTAFFING AND CUTTING. THANK YOU.

Mon, May 23, 2011

I was a U.S.P.S Letter Carrier for 18 years before retiring a couple of months ago. Many times employees tried to submit suggestions to improve task involving our jobs. But educated and UNeducated Managers and Supervisors would not listen to anyone and still don't. Some of the dumbest people I every worked for were Station Managers. They would go hide or just leave the station for 3 hours or more during the busiest part of the day and said don't call me, but handle the problem. But when it became time for the bonus checks they were the first to brag about how much they got. I believe that BONUS checks or WRINGING OUT money should be eliminated. Managers/Supervisors are paid to do a job and if they can't then they can elect to go back to craft. I believe that the postal Service is the biggest descriminator of people and use the good old boy program to pick and choose who they want in Supervisory positions. I applied 4 times and passed the tests but was never called for any type of interview to get into the ASP program. And I had over 20 yrs of supervisory experience from a previous job.

Fri, May 13, 2011

I am not alarmed by the salaries since they are much less than what a similar job in the corporate world would pay. The responsibility and difficulty of managing a business as large as the U.S. Post Servicee is great. The function of the USPS is mandated by law and does not have the freedom to change its function and operations as freely as many corporate businesses. As the economy and society move away from paper communication media to electronic media, the USPS has been more restricting in making the transition and in competing with private industry. So if you want to compare the USPS to private industry, then let the USPS compete like private; otherwise, it is what it is. By the way, I am not or have ever been a USPS employee.

Fri, May 13, 2011 Walter PR

I am not a postal worker, but a little while ago I did a casual internet survey of the 1st class postal rates of various nations. We were close to the lowest, if not the lowest, of all of them in US$. Maybe we should adjust our rates to the international median and solve these problems. While I would not want to pay more, I don't want to lose Saturday delivery or more offices either.

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