Delrina upgrades FormFlow

Symantec Corp.'s Delrina Group today announced FormFlow 2.0, a major upgrade of the company's federally popular electronic forms software.

FormFlow 2.0 offers features that may strike a cord with federal users: the ability to store forms on Internet file transfer protocol (ftp) sites and an encryption feature that lets users send forms securely over public electronic-mail systems and the Internet. The product also includes graphical Routing Designer software and an object-oriented programming language that makes it easier to map work flow and create forms.

FormFlow 1.1 has landed on a number of federal contracts, including the Army's Sustaining Base Information Services and NASA's Scientific and Engineering Workstation Procurement [FCW, Nov. 20, 1995]. Three federal customers—the Army, the Federal Aviation Administration and the Labor Department—are beta testing FormFlow 2.0, Delrina said.

FormFlow 2.0 is slated to ship in the second quarter of fiscal '96. Delrina officials said the product will be offered on its federal contracts and through resellers.

Expanded Features

FormFlow 2.0 provides administrators with several new options for storing and managing electronic forms. FormFlow 2.0's Form Library allows an organization to store forms in ftp sites, local- or network-based file systems or databases. Forms can also be stored in Microsoft Exchange folders.

FormFlow 2.0 will ship with encryption code from RSA, protecting forms and data from tampering. But because the software is plugged into an application programming interface, other encryption products, such as Northern Telecom's Entrust, can be substituted.

The FormFlow 2.0 Starter Kit starts at $399.

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