LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Sign Language

I was struck by your page 1 "thumbs down" depicting the ALMRS program over the headline "Early Indicators for Major IT Programs" [FCW, Jan. 22]. If memory serves me correctly, I believe the "thumbs down" symbol is usually indicative of the fate of those poor souls who are about to die in a Roman arena.

As the CSC executive responsible for the ALMRS program, I can assure you ALMRS is far from dead. In fact, ALMRS is healthy despite some reductions in the fiscal '96 budget and two government shutdowns. ALMRS, by definition, is a complex program involving geographic information systems in a client/server distributed environment. We have successfully deployed on schedule close to 6,000 workstation configurations and associated peripherals and communications equipment in over 150 locations in 14 states. The legacy systems have been rehosted, and we are in Formal Qualification Test for the 358,000 lines of codes for the Automated Land and Mineral Record System unique to the Bureau of Land Management, all on schedule and budget. ALMRS is an indicator of how solid government planning and private-sector management can work together to achieve sustained results.

With this in mind, a "thumbs up" would be more suitable to describe this essential Department of the Interior program being made possible by the efforts of both the federal government and a dedicated industry partner.

Marcia M. Kim

Vice President

Application Programs

Computer Sciences Corp.

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