Army studying IT recruitment

The Army has kicked off a yearlong study to help determine how to better recruit and maintain its information technology work force, with an emphasis on how the service can use financial inducements to attract workers.

The charter of the Army Information Technology/Information Assurance Workforce Issues Study placed compensation first in the list of issues and challenges the Army must address to attract and retain IT personnel in a technology-driven economy. The study also will look at non-monetary inducements.

Lt. Gen. Larry Ellis, Army deputy chief of staff for operations and plans, said the study will help the Army produce policy and resource recommendations to enhance IT recruitment, retention, education and training.

In addition, the Army will use the study to develop a table of organization for its Force XXI digitized battleforce by next August.

Gen. John Keane, Army vice chief of staff, described IT and information systems as the "dominant" issues the Army needs to keep in mind as it develops and fields the digitized battle force. The soldiers and civilian Army employees who operate those Force XXI systems "will always remain the linchpin to ensure success in information dominance and to counter the continued threats and security issues for our information networks,'' Keane said in a Sept. 22 memo.

Keane asked the help of all Army IT professionals in developing these new IT personnel policies and procedures by filling out an online survey (www.itiasurvey.army.pentagon.mil) no later than Nov. 20.

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