Tulsa, Okla., Takes Laid-Back Approach

The Year 2000 bug is not expected to cause any major problems in Tulsa, Okla. The local government there has taken a relatively laid-back approach in its precautions for when the clock strikes midnight on Dec. 31.

"We've gone through and done all the normal checks," said mayor's assistant Louis VanLandingham. "We're fairly certain everything is going to work, but there are contingency plans in place," in case something goes wrong.

The city's emergency operations center will be open, but not activated, meaning there will be about 12 people on staff there for the date change, as opposed to about 50 staffers for an emergency, VanLandingham said.

Tulsa will have additional police on duty held over from their day shifts and others on call, as well as myriad public works employees on call, he said.

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