Public/private standoff

Electronic business experts predict that the line between electronic services

that should be provided by government and those that should be provided

by business will continue to blur.

* By 2003, more than 60 percent of government agencies will allow citizens

to conduct some form of electronic transaction. (Source: Gartner Group Inc.)

* Agencies may hire companies to provide electronic services and permit

them to charge transaction fees. "That's where the real serious battles

will be" as companies compete to do government business. (Patrice McDermott,

OMB Watch)

* The U.S. Postal Service has begun to charge a fee to banks that want

to install automated teller machines in inner-city post offices. More partnerships

with private companies will develop. (U.S. Postal Service)

* By 2003, Americans should have access to all government information

and be able to conduct all their government business online. (National Partnership

for Reinventing Government)

* E-government will provide better access to agencies. Constituents

will talk online with agency personnel through chat rooms or voice communication.

"E-mail is not sufficient." (Government Electronics and Information Technology

Association)

* U.S. government spending on electronic services will increase from

$1.5 billion in 2000 to $6.2 billion in 2005. (Gartner Group)

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