Not making a federal case

Powerful computers and a new operating system from Apple Computer Inc. might not be enough to persuade federal agencies to dump their Windows PCs and Unix. A significant issue for agencies is whether Apple will take them seriously and respond to their needs appropriately.

Microsoft Corp.'s Bill Gates and Dell Computer Corp.'s Michael Dell are known to visit their federal customers to discuss the issues important to them. That has contributed to the success of both companies' products in the market. But Apple seems to view federal customers somewhat askance.

Apple's federal team is dedicated to its task, but it appears it is not receiving the necessary support from the corporate headquarters in Cupertino, Calif. To the obvious frustration of the federal team members, they were prohibited from speaking for this story. Instead, the company issued a statement describing the commitment of its federal sales force and the popularity of its products in the market.

The reason no federal people were permitted to speak? Apple has approved spokespeople only for its core businesses: the consumer, commercial and education markets, according to the company.

The raft of product announcements gives Apple the chance to boost its fortunes with federal customers, if only the company would embrace those customers, said Dendy Young, chairman and chief executive officer of Apple reseller GTSI Corp. in Chantilly, Va. Young founded then-exclusive Apple reseller Falcon Microsystems in 1985, before selling the company to GTSI in 1994.

"I would call on Apple to take government customers very seriously and create a new marketing and sales organization for this market," Young said. "We have customers who are treated inappropriately for their size and quality."


  • Congress
    U.S. Capitol (Photo by M DOGAN / Shutterstock)

    Funding bill clears Congress, heads for president's desk

    The $1.3 trillion spending package passed the House of Representatives on March 22 and the Senate in the early hours of March 23. President Trump is expected to sign the bill, securing government funding for the remainder of fiscal year 2018.

  • 2018 Fed 100

    The 2018 Federal 100

    This year's Fed 100 winners show just how much committed and talented individuals can accomplish in federal IT. Read their profiles to learn more!

  • Census
    How tech can save money for 2020 census

    Trump campaign taps census question as a fund-raising tool

    A fundraising email for the Trump-Pence reelection campaign is trying to get supporters behind a controversial change to the census -- asking respondents whether or not they are U.S. citizens.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.