Voice of security

In a security-conscious world, a new generation of clever telephony applications is enough to convince federal agencies that IP telephony is ready for prime time.

"Security is a major issue in the federal government, and secure communications is the mantra," said Howard Stern, senior vice president for Federal Sources Inc., a consulting firm based in McLean, Va. "Lots of applications that, at face value, don't cause you to think about security are important within the realm of cyberterrorism. Before voice over IP is fully accepted within the federal government, its security implications will have to be worked out."

IP telephony vendors are starting to hear this message. For example, Avaya Inc. provides PBX-management software that includes encryption for voice traffic to ensure that hackers "can't steal a call," said Mack Leathurby, the company director of converged solutions marketing.

In addition, SecureLogix Corp. now sells a voice firewall that protects merged circuit-switched and IP telephony networks from modem-based break-ins and data thefts. According to the company, the technology also protects IP telephony networks from denial-of-service attacks.

About the Author

Alan Joch is a freelance writer based in New Hampshire.

Featured

  • Cybersecurity

    DHS floats 'collective defense' model for cybersecurity

    Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen wants her department to have a more direct role in defending the private sector and critical infrastructure entities from cyberthreats.

  • Defense
    Defense Secretary James Mattis testifies at an April 12 hearing of the House Armed Services Committee.

    Mattis: Cloud deal not tailored for Amazon

    On Capitol Hill, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis sought to quell "rumors" that the Pentagon's planned single-award cloud acquisition was designed with Amazon Web Services in mind.

  • Census
    shutterstock image

    2020 Census to include citizenship question

    The Department of Commerce is breaking with recent practice and restoring a question about respondent citizenship last used in 1950, despite being urged not to by former Census directors and outside experts.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.