A new cluster option

Organizations have quite a few options for connecting clusters.

There's the time-tested Ethernet and the latest variation, 10 Gigabit Ethernet. There are high-end specialty solutions such as Myricom Inc.'s Myrinet and Quadrics Ltd.'s QsNet. And then there's a newcomer, InfiniBand, an open specification offering a high-speed, — currently up to 10 gigabits/sec but headed toward 30 gigabits/sec — low-latency interconnect technology. InfiniBand debuted in October 2000, but the technology has only recently started to catch on.

The product has found its initial niche in the high-performance computing community. Organizations pursuing clusters with 32 nodes or more are evaluating it as an option, according to Chuck Foley, chief executive officer of InfiniCon Systems Inc., a switching solutions vendor.

"We are seeing interest in InfiniBand as a Linux clustering interconnect," said Brad Benton, a senior architect at Fabric Networks Inc., which makes InfiniBand switches.

InfiniBand also is seen as a good fit for database clustering. Oracle Corp. later this year is expected to offer native support for InfiniBand. Adoption of it in the database space could propel the technology out of the lab and into mainstream data centers.

Ben Eiref, director of product marketing at switch maker Topspin Communications Inc., refers to databases as the "killer [application] for the success of our products and InfiniBand's success in general."

The Fed 100

Save the date for 28th annual Federal 100 Awards Gala.

Featured

  • Social network, census

    5 predictions for federal IT in 2017

    As the Trump team takes control, here's what the tech community can expect.

  • Rep. Gerald Connolly

    Connolly warns on workforce changes

    The ranking member of the House Oversight Committee's Government Operations panel warns that Congress will look to legislate changes to the federal workforce.

  • President Donald J. Trump delivers his inaugural address

    How will Trump lead on tech?

    The businessman turned reality star turned U.S. president clearly has mastered Twitter, but what will his administration mean for broader technology issues?

  • Login.gov moving ahead

    The bid to establish a single login for accessing government services is moving again on the last full day of the Obama presidency.

  • Shutterstock image (by Jirsak): customer care, relationship management, and leadership concept.

    Obama wraps up security clearance reforms

    In a last-minute executive order, President Obama institutes structural reforms to the security clearance process designed to create a more unified system across government agencies.

  • Shutterstock image: breached lock.

    What cyber can learn from counterterrorism

    The U.S. has to look at its experience in developing post-9/11 counterterrorism policies to inform efforts to formalize cybersecurity policies, says a senior official.

Reader comments

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

More from 1105 Public Sector Media Group