Feds arrange responder priorities

Federal officials have begun an ambitious effort with representatives of state and local governments, police, fire, emergency management and public health associations to compile a comprehensive list of first responder priorities.

Officials will examine numerous reports, studies and surveys conducted during the past several years regarding the needs of first responders and consolidate the findings into one document.

The intent is to better help officials focus their efforts and resources for research and technology, said Richard Jacques, a senior program manager with the U.S. Justice Department's National Institute of Justice, which is responsible for evaluating technologies designed to enhance emergency personnel's responses to critical incidents.

"We want to basically have a consolidated document that identifies needs and requirements in order of priority that can be agreed to by these associations and organizations," Jacques said.

Those priorities will most likely include developing interoperable radio communications systems. The critical need for such systems became apparent during the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attack on the World Trade Center when the inability of firefighters and police from different jurisdictions to communicate with one another hampered rescue efforts.

Jacques hopes the groups will produce a final report within a month or two. That information will also be provided to the National Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism, an Oklahoma-based nonprofit organization formed after the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing.

Kevin Shanley, a senior policy analyst with the National Governors Association's Homeland Security and Technology Division, said the organizations' representatives are already compiling a large number of documents, and he expects to be involved throughout the process.

FCW in Print

In the latest issue: Looking back on three decades of big stories in federal IT.


  • Anne Rung -- Commerce Department Photo

    Exit interview with Anne Rung

    The government's departing top acquisition official said she leaves behind a solid foundation on which to build more effective and efficient federal IT.

  • Charles Phalen

    Administration appoints first head of NBIB

    The National Background Investigations Bureau announced the appointment of its first director as the agency prepares to take over processing government background checks.

  • Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.)

    Senator: Rigid hiring process pushes millennials from federal work

    Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.) said agencies are missing out on younger workers because of the government's rigidity, particularly its protracted hiring process.

  • FCW @ 30 GPS

    FCW @ 30

    Since 1987, FCW has covered it all -- the major contracts, the disruptive technologies, the picayune scandals and the many, many people who make federal IT function. Here's a look back at six of the most significant stories.

  • Shutterstock image.

    A 'minibus' appropriations package could be in the cards

    A short-term funding bill is expected by Sept. 30 to keep the federal government operating through early December, but after that the options get more complicated.

  • Defense Secretary Ash Carter speaks at the TechCrunch Disrupt conference in San Francisco

    DOD launches new tech hub in Austin

    The DOD is opening a new Defense Innovation Unit Experimental office in Austin, Texas, while Congress debates legislation that could defund DIUx.

Reader comments

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

More from 1105 Public Sector Media Group