A fresh outlook

Readers will notice some changes in the look and feel of this first issue of 2004. The changes, including a slightly larger format and an updated design, are intended to make it easier for readers to navigate and to offer easy entry points to find information.

Habits change; therefore, we are mindful of the lesson from Charles Darwin that it is not the strongest or the fastest who survives. Instead, those who survive are those who adapt best.

From talking to our readers, we have learned that how you gather and use information has changed. You look for news and source documents online. You think charts and graphs and comparisons work better in print. You need better links to and from online content. You want to understand what is where and why, and you need a distinction between what is online and what is in print. This new package is our effort to meet your needs.

You will find new sections — and signposts will help you find them. We have placed a new emphasis on research and original survey material, and a companion redesign of our online offerings is keyed to your need to find information quickly.

We believe our new packaging is not only cosmetic, but also a substantive response to the way our readers want to look for and use information. We welcome your response. This, as always, is a work in progress and is performance-based — we count on our readers to let us know how we are doing.

This first issue marks the new design and the new year with a special report, the Federal Computer Week Watch List. Our team of reporters culled insights and opinions from people across the federal community to assemble lists of the people, programs, technologies and policies that figure prominently on the agenda for 2004.

The lists are necessarily subjective and open to disagreement. Submit your thoughts at www.fcw.com/fcwdownload — our new online resource for magazine readers. And let the debates begin.

Anne A. Armstrong, Publisher John Monroe, Editor

FCW Media Group Federal Computer Week

Featured

  • People
    Dr. Ronny Jackson briefs the press on President Trump

    Uncertainty at VA after nominee withdraws

    With White House physician Adm. Ronny Jackson's withdrawal, VA watchers are wondering what's next for the agency and its planned $16 billion health IT modernization project.

  • Cybersecurity

    DHS floats 'collective defense' model for cybersecurity

    Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen wants her department to have a more direct role in defending the private sector and critical infrastructure entities from cyberthreats.

  • Defense
    Defense Secretary James Mattis testifies at an April 12 hearing of the House Armed Services Committee.

    Mattis: Cloud deal not tailored for Amazon

    On Capitol Hill, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis sought to quell "rumors" that the Pentagon's planned single-award cloud acquisition was designed with Amazon Web Services in mind.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.