5 steps to building content-rich e-learning systems

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1 Develop a good business plan for the e-learning system and a framework for how it will mesh with personnel policies and other information technology systems that support it such as financial management and human resources systems.

2 Monitor your technology infrastructure, particularly its ability to manage and deliver e-learning content, including rich media such as streaming audio and video.

3 Identify relevant content that already exists in the organization and determine the type of new content that you need to develop.

4 Be flexible about what content should be integrated into the online e-learning system. Older course content may not be worth converting to a format compatible with a new system. It also might be best left on a CD-ROM, for example, which is more appropriate for certain applications, such as training workers who have irregular access to network computers.

5 Choose standards-based products whenever possible, but be sure to verify interoperability among the products you want to use before buying. Most e-learning vendors now support a variety of standards, but this still doesn't guarantee that all products will work together in your

environment.

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