Using technology to protect privacy

Data mining raises fears about the loss of privacy. But officials at the Center for Democracy and Technology have identified three approaches to designing data-mining projects that can protect personal information held in government and commercial databases. They are:

Make databases anonymous by encrypting first and last names to prevent unnecessary and potentially harmful disclosure of personal information.

Build permission rules into the databases and database queries to control access to personal information.

Use the databases to create audit trails that cannot be altered by someone trying to hide evidence of privacy abuses.

Source: Center for Democracy and Technology

Featured

  • Cybersecurity

    DHS floats 'collective defense' model for cybersecurity

    Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen wants her department to have a more direct role in defending the private sector and critical infrastructure entities from cyberthreats.

  • Defense
    Defense Secretary James Mattis testifies at an April 12 hearing of the House Armed Services Committee.

    Mattis: Cloud deal not tailored for Amazon

    On Capitol Hill, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis sought to quell "rumors" that the Pentagon's planned single-award cloud acquisition was designed with Amazon Web Services in mind.

  • Census
    shutterstock image

    2020 Census to include citizenship question

    The Department of Commerce is breaking with recent practice and restoring a question about respondent citizenship last used in 1950, despite being urged not to by former Census directors and outside experts.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.