The dog that won't bite back

Barking dogs are a familiar problem for mail carriers. But loud, threatening animals are also problems for U.S. Census Bureau remunerators who go door-to-door to help count the population. One remunerator died after a dog attack in 2000.

To combat such menaces, Census officials will provide employees with handheld computers in 2010. The systems will warn users about possibly dangerous pets at specific addresses, said Thomas Pyke, chief information officer at the Commerce Department, which oversees the census.

Officials will obtain information for the system from U.S. Postal Service records, which track problem animals and their residences, Pyke said at a July 22 breakfast sponsored by ICG Government.

Never say goodbye

It seems Cabinet-level officials get special privileges even at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport.

Our sources observed Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan, accompanied by a tough-looking man with an earpiece, circumventing the Transportation Security Administration's screening process July 24 to accompany his wife to the boarding area for her flight. His wife, NBC News correspondent Andrea Mitchell, was on her way to Boston to cover the Democratic National Convention. Greenspan walked her to the gate where she boarded her flight.

As most of us know, only ticketed passengers are allowed past the metal detectors to the gate. Talk about fed privileges!

Mad about cows

Officials from the House Agriculture Committee's Livestock and Horticulture Subcommittee did not expect the stampede of interested observers who sought to attend the July 22 hearing on a system to track the movement of cattle to possibly prevent a mad cow disease epidemic.

Reporters relegated to an overflow room were frustrated that no live video feed was available

FCW in Print

In the latest issue: Looking back on three decades of big stories in federal IT.


  • Anne Rung -- Commerce Department Photo

    Exit interview with Anne Rung

    The government's departing top acquisition official said she leaves behind a solid foundation on which to build more effective and efficient federal IT.

  • Charles Phalen

    Administration appoints first head of NBIB

    The National Background Investigations Bureau announced the appointment of its first director as the agency prepares to take over processing government background checks.

  • Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.)

    Senator: Rigid hiring process pushes millennials from federal work

    Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.) said agencies are missing out on younger workers because of the government's rigidity, particularly its protracted hiring process.

  • FCW @ 30 GPS

    FCW @ 30

    Since 1987, FCW has covered it all -- the major contracts, the disruptive technologies, the picayune scandals and the many, many people who make federal IT function. Here's a look back at six of the most significant stories.

  • Shutterstock image.

    A 'minibus' appropriations package could be in the cards

    A short-term funding bill is expected by Sept. 30 to keep the federal government operating through early December, but after that the options get more complicated.

  • Defense Secretary Ash Carter speaks at the TechCrunch Disrupt conference in San Francisco

    DOD launches new tech hub in Austin

    The DOD is opening a new Defense Innovation Unit Experimental office in Austin, Texas, while Congress debates legislation that could defund DIUx.

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