The dog that won't bite back

Barking dogs are a familiar problem for mail carriers. But loud, threatening animals are also problems for U.S. Census Bureau remunerators who go door-to-door to help count the population. One remunerator died after a dog attack in 2000.

To combat such menaces, Census officials will provide employees with handheld computers in 2010. The systems will warn users about possibly dangerous pets at specific addresses, said Thomas Pyke, chief information officer at the Commerce Department, which oversees the census.

Officials will obtain information for the system from U.S. Postal Service records, which track problem animals and their residences, Pyke said at a July 22 breakfast sponsored by ICG Government.

Never say goodbye

It seems Cabinet-level officials get special privileges even at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport.

Our sources observed Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan, accompanied by a tough-looking man with an earpiece, circumventing the Transportation Security Administration's screening process July 24 to accompany his wife to the boarding area for her flight. His wife, NBC News correspondent Andrea Mitchell, was on her way to Boston to cover the Democratic National Convention. Greenspan walked her to the gate where she boarded her flight.

As most of us know, only ticketed passengers are allowed past the metal detectors to the gate. Talk about fed privileges!

Mad about cows

Officials from the House Agriculture Committee's Livestock and Horticulture Subcommittee did not expect the stampede of interested observers who sought to attend the July 22 hearing on a system to track the movement of cattle to possibly prevent a mad cow disease epidemic.

Reporters relegated to an overflow room were frustrated that no live video feed was available


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