AFS keeps going

Related Links

Cluster headaches

Andrew File System (AFS) was among the early distributed file systems, but it continues to play a role amid newer developments.

The technology started life as the product of a 1980s research project at Carnegie Mellon University. In 1989, a group of researchers from the university launched Transarc Corp. to sell the technology under the AFS label.

IBM Corp. bought Transarc in 1994 and eventually released its code to the open-source community, resulting in OpenAFS. Arla is another open-source version of AFS.

Additionally, AFS has influenced other products. For example, AFS' underlying principles helped shape Spinnaker Networks Inc.'s SpinServer storage solution. Officials at Network Appliance Inc., which acquired Spinnaker earlier this year, plan to integrate Spinnaker's technology with NetApp's Data OnTap operating system, said Jeff Hornung, vice president and general manager of NetApp's Gateway Business Unit.

He said the plan is to merge the two products into a common storage grid in the next three years.

Featured

  • Cybersecurity
    cybersecurity (Rawpixel/Shutterstock.com)

    CMMC clears key regulatory hurdle

    The White House approved an interim rule to mandate defense contractors prove they adhere to existing cybersecurity standards from the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

  • Comment
    cloud (Phaigraphic/Shutterstock.com)

    A call for visionary investment

    Investing in IT modernization is not an either-or proposition, Rep. Connolly writes. This pandemic has presented Congress a choice: We can put our head in the sand and pretend these failures didn't happen, or we can take action to be prepared for the future.

Stay Connected