IPv6 has class

IP Version 6 continues to gain ground among agencies, and that means people need to know all the ins and outs about it. According to officials at training firm Native6, IPv6 is more than a souped-up successor to IPv4.

It's probably not coincidental, then, that Native6 officials have created new courses and augmented others to reflect the growing IPv6 user base.

Officials announced last week that they have updated the Building IPv6 Networks course, completed an IPv6 training program for Cisco Systems employees and launched an entirely new course, IPv6 for Programmers.

Military agencies have been the most fertile market for Native6 so far. Company officials said they have taught the five-day Building IPv6 Networks course to employees at the Joint Interoperability Testing Command, the Army's Electronic Proving Ground, the U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command, the Marine Corps Network Operations and Security Command, and the Navy IPv6 Project Office, Office of the Chief Engineer, at the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command.

For Cisco, Native6 officials provide content and subject matter expertise for the company's internal IPv6 Accelerate program, said Yurie Rich, president of Native6.

Civilian agencies are exploring the adoption of IPv6, too, Rich said, but, "I think they don't have the technical mandate or the kind of a technical need that [the Defense Department] has."

The company grew from the ashes of a now-defunct Internet service provider called Zama Networks, Rich said. When Native6 first began offering training in 2001, the customers were largely major information technology firms, including Hewlett-Packard and Symantec, he said. Then DOD officials began calling.

The new offerings represent the evolving needs in the market, he said. There are still plenty of customers who have little knowledge of IPv6 and need to learn the fundamentals.

But there are also a growing number who have the foundation and are ready to move to more advanced topics. Additionally, the technology continues to evolve, he said.

FCW in Print

In the latest issue: Looking back on three decades of big stories in federal IT.


  • Anne Rung -- Commerce Department Photo

    Exit interview with Anne Rung

    The government's departing top acquisition official said she leaves behind a solid foundation on which to build more effective and efficient federal IT.

  • Charles Phalen

    Administration appoints first head of NBIB

    The National Background Investigations Bureau announced the appointment of its first director as the agency prepares to take over processing government background checks.

  • Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.)

    Senator: Rigid hiring process pushes millennials from federal work

    Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.) said agencies are missing out on younger workers because of the government's rigidity, particularly its protracted hiring process.

  • FCW @ 30 GPS

    FCW @ 30

    Since 1987, FCW has covered it all -- the major contracts, the disruptive technologies, the picayune scandals and the many, many people who make federal IT function. Here's a look back at six of the most significant stories.

  • Shutterstock image.

    A 'minibus' appropriations package could be in the cards

    A short-term funding bill is expected by Sept. 30 to keep the federal government operating through early December, but after that the options get more complicated.

  • Defense Secretary Ash Carter speaks at the TechCrunch Disrupt conference in San Francisco

    DOD launches new tech hub in Austin

    The DOD is opening a new Defense Innovation Unit Experimental office in Austin, Texas, while Congress debates legislation that could defund DIUx.

Reader comments

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

More from 1105 Public Sector Media Group