L.A. mulls open source

Three Los Angeles council members want the city to switch to an open-source platform to save millions of dollars in software costs.

Council members Eric Garcetti, Wendy Greul and Jack Weiss introduced a motion yesterday asking the city's Information Technology Agency about a transition from proprietary software licenses to open-source platforms and programs. The money saved could be used to hire more police personnel, the council members said.

City officials spent $5.8 million on proprietary software licenses for the fiscal year that ran from July 1, 2003, to June 30, 2004.

"For taxpayers, this is a no-brainer," Garcetti said in a press release. "By engaging this online community, we can make our own communities safer. Free open-source software can be as capable and more secure than products that cost the city millions."

Open-source software ... the most widely known example is the Linux operating system ... is a program with source code that is publicly available and generally free, although some vendors charge for their distributions of Linux.

Los Angeles government officials use some open-source applications now, including OpenOffice.org, a desktop computer suite that includes a word processor, spreadsheet program and Linux. Not all proprietary software, such as those tailored specifically for the city, could be replaced. The motion recommends that savings from the transition be placed in a special fund for efficiency projects and police hiring.

Featured

  • Cybersecurity

    DHS floats 'collective defense' model for cybersecurity

    Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen wants her department to have a more direct role in defending the private sector and critical infrastructure entities from cyberthreats.

  • Defense
    Defense Secretary James Mattis testifies at an April 12 hearing of the House Armed Services Committee.

    Mattis: Cloud deal not tailored for Amazon

    On Capitol Hill, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis sought to quell "rumors" that the Pentagon's planned single-award cloud acquisition was designed with Amazon Web Services in mind.

  • Census
    shutterstock image

    2020 Census to include citizenship question

    The Department of Commerce is breaking with recent practice and restoring a question about respondent citizenship last used in 1950, despite being urged not to by former Census directors and outside experts.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.