Adobe targets governments with LiveCycle

Adobe Systems is trying to strengthen its hold on federal, state and local markets with a new version of LiveCycle, the company's workflow management software.

Steve Rotter, senior product marketing manager at Adobe, said the company has been aggressively pursuing the enterprise market for about three years.

The company is perhaps best known for its Acrobat Distiller and Reader products, which create and display PDF files. Its graphics design software, such as Photoshop and PageMaker, are widely used. Rotter said the company also makes software to help organizations function better, and LiveCycle is an example.

Agencies and other organizations are trying to automate workflow processes, which often include hundreds of individual processes.

"What we're seeing is a great need for taking that to the next level," Rotter said. "That need has been around probably for a long time, but there hasn't been a cost-effective way to do that."

In Kane County, Ill., Circuit Court Clerk Deborah Seyller has been leading a project to convert court processes to paperless ones using LiveCycle. The first project she undertook was to automate the processing of petitions for protective orders. People who need such orders can now fill out the forms online. The system routes the forms through a validation process and then to a judge, who electronically approves or rejects them.

Seyller plans to tackle the processes for issuing warrants next.

The county began using LiveCycle because Adobe bought an earlier forms-building software application that the county had been using and then began offering new products, she said.

"When they offered [LiveCycle], it was like the answer to our prayers," Seyller said. "We had been looking since 1997. Not even the hardware was in place. Nobody had laptops that would do forms. Now they have tablet PCs. Everything's falling into place."

FCW in Print

In the latest issue: Looking back on three decades of big stories in federal IT.


  • Anne Rung -- Commerce Department Photo

    Exit interview with Anne Rung

    The government's departing top acquisition official said she leaves behind a solid foundation on which to build more effective and efficient federal IT.

  • Charles Phalen

    Administration appoints first head of NBIB

    The National Background Investigations Bureau announced the appointment of its first director as the agency prepares to take over processing government background checks.

  • Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.)

    Senator: Rigid hiring process pushes millennials from federal work

    Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.) said agencies are missing out on younger workers because of the government's rigidity, particularly its protracted hiring process.

  • FCW @ 30 GPS

    FCW @ 30

    Since 1987, FCW has covered it all -- the major contracts, the disruptive technologies, the picayune scandals and the many, many people who make federal IT function. Here's a look back at six of the most significant stories.

  • Shutterstock image.

    A 'minibus' appropriations package could be in the cards

    A short-term funding bill is expected by Sept. 30 to keep the federal government operating through early December, but after that the options get more complicated.

  • Defense Secretary Ash Carter speaks at the TechCrunch Disrupt conference in San Francisco

    DOD launches new tech hub in Austin

    The DOD is opening a new Defense Innovation Unit Experimental office in Austin, Texas, while Congress debates legislation that could defund DIUx.

Reader comments

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

More from 1105 Public Sector Media Group