EPA's Nelson heads to Microsoft

Kim Nelson, the Environmental Protection Agency's chief information officer, is leaving to become executive director of e-government at Microsoft.

Nelson served on the Executive Committee of the CIO Council and was co-chairwoman of its Architecture and Infrastructure Committee. While on the CIO Council, she helped produce a data reference model, an important tool in the effort to improve agencies' ability to share information.

In her newly created position, Nelson will help develop Microsoft's e-government strategy. She will work with government CIOs and other leaders to establish "long-term strategies and vision for more efficient and cost-effective online services," Microsoft officials said in a statement.

"Her role will also include extensive collaboration with Microsoft's vast partner ecosystem, working to drive solutions that will ensure the predictable delivery of improved online services while helping to reduce the cost, risk and deployment time associated with sophisticated e-government systems," according to Microsoft.

Nelson, who will start her new job in January 2006, will report to Scott Suhy, general manager of Microsoft's U.S. industry unit and leader of the company's worldwide partner strategy.

In her resignation letter to President Bush, Nelson said she is leaving the EPA well-positioned to support citizen-centric government and its "challenging mission of protecting human health and safeguarding the natural environment." She added that she has worked hard to ensure that the EPA receives a green score on the e-government portion of the management score card.

"Kim has been an excellent leader on the CIO Council's Executive Committee and instrumental in the success of the Architecture and Infrastructure Committee," said Dan Matthews, Transportation Department CIO. "She is tireless, enthusiastic, and her participation is exemplary. Her presence will be missed."

-- Judi Hasson

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