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Worst congressional Web sites

CNet’s Worst Political Web sites

What’s on lawmakers’ Web sites? CNet.com conducted a survey and found a bit of everything: a blog that reportedly belongs to a congressional representative’s dog, a candidate’s blog that has nothing posted to it and another on which the owner posted her recipes.

We have included a few examples, along with excerpts of CNet’s critiques. Find links to these Web sites and a link to CNet’s review of the worst of congressional Web sites on FCW.com Download’s Data Call at www.fcw.com/download.

Robert Seals (I-Calif.)

CNet describes Seals’ Web site as “not very well-crafted,” although it noted that Seals “won us over with this endearing animal photo on his Web site.” It’s a pig.

Rep. Kay Granger (R-Texas)

Granger’s site includes recipes — yes, recipes. CNet reviewers wrote, “Politics is a dreary business in which our esteemed leaders vote on bills they’ve never read, pontificate about topics they know nothing about and placate funders they don’t even like. That’s why we toast Texas Rep. Kay Granger, who’s running for re-election, for bringing the party to the Republican Party with her ‘killer margarita’ recipe.”

Shawn O’Donnell (D-Va.)

Who cares what the candidates think? We want to know their pets’ views. That is apparently the thinking behind O’Donnell’s site, which includes a blog by his dog, Josie. “Shawn O’Donnell is ‘caring, patient, and smart — and he has integrity.’” That’s according to no less an authority than Josie, who pens a bizarre blog on O’Donnell’s campaign Web site.

Rep. James Wright (D-Texas)

Red, white and blue is all over this Web site. Wright “has a sincere appreciation for red and blue text and an obvious willingness to use it,” CNet said.

Rep. Jay Inslee (D-Wash.)

Inslee’s district includes Microsoft’s headquarters in Redmond, Wash. His campaign Web site includes an internal search engine and options for e-mailing entries. But the blog doesn’t include a single post.

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