Technology briefs

Open Text unveils ECM 10
Open Text revealed the next major release of its enterprise content management software last week.

Livelink ECM 10 allows users to apply business content across all applications and addresses governance and regulatory compliance requirements. The company is working to move content management beyond simply tracking and controlling information to using it to establish business advantages, Open Text officials said.

Many enterprises treat content management as a separate function from applications such as finance, customer relationship management or supply chain planning. They don’t have a link between information stored in e-mail or document archives and enterprise applications, Open Text officials said. The lack of integration creates compliance risks and inefficiencies for workers.

New functions in Livelink ECM 10 address these issues. For example, the Enterprise Library Services function seamlessly integrates archival, metadata management, enterprise records management and search capabilities. Other features allow users to access business content in enterprise resource planning systems, such as customer information or purchase order documents, from their Microsoft Outlook e-mail interface. 

Next year, a new client interface will let Livelink users access business content while working in Microsoft desktop applications, including Outlook, Office and Internet Explorer. In addition, new Web Services APIs for Enterprise Library Services will allow users and partners to easily integrate Livelink ECM 10 with enterprise applications, Open Text officials said.

Blue Coat secures remote users
Blue Coat Systems has released its SG Client architecture to secure devices used by remote or mobile users.

The new client-based software works with Blue Coat’s family of intelligent appliances to ensure wide-area network application performance and security for all users across a distributed network. Because mobile and remote users now comprise a significant portion of all employees, a unified architecture that extends application acceleration and security control to such users is an emerging information technology requirement, Blue Coat officials said.

SG Client will incorporate Blue Coat’s MACH5 application acceleration technology, which provides protocol optimization, object and byte caching, and compression to speed application delivery and reduce bandwidth usage.

The software is designed to protect remote systems, such as desktop and laptop computers and personal digital assistants, and the information that resides on them during a secure session. It enforces corporate policies by controlling content and applications, protecting against spyware and performing URL filtering.

Blue Coat will deliver SG Client in several phases. The first release is scheduled for next year.

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