Editorial: New Year’s resolutions

This is the last issue of Federal Computer Week for 2007, so we’d like to share some hopes and resolutions for 2008:

■ For the Bush administration/Office of Management and Budget: The countdown continues — 399 days left. Getting anything done becomes increasingly difficult as Jan. 20, 2009, nears. But we encourage the administration not to coast through the coming year.

■ For federal agencies: We believe Government 2.0 is on OMB’s to-do list. It should be. Agencies could benefit from putting into practice some of the principles of Web 2.0 applications, including the notions that all of us together are smarter than any one of us and sharing information can produce powerful results.

■ For Rep. Henry Waxman (D-Calif.):We hope the chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee will sit down for an interview with Federal Computer Week to discuss what he wants to accomplish.

■ For Rep. Tom Davis (R-Va.):We hope Davis decides to run for re-election in November. There are few other lawmakers who know or care about government procurement and information technology issues as much as he does.

■ For feds: We encourage you to resolve not to get mired in final-year syndrome and instead be a beacon of good government.

■ For Congress generally: Lawmakers have managed to attain what many thought was impossible: popularity ratings that rival those of a war-torn president. Few things are as simple as they seem, and there are certainly many reasons for those numbers.

Yet we have to believe that one is the inability to move beyond their differences to get work done.

One example: Moving into the second quarter of the fiscal year, Congress has yet to approve spending bills. There is blame on both ends of Pennsylvania Avenue, and the battle has an enormous impact on agencies’ ability to accomplish their missions.

■ Presidential candidates: We all understand that government management issues are not high on any presidential campaign’s platform, but the election this year has been filled with hyperbole. Republican candidate Rudy Giuliani made the foolish contention that his administration would not fill the positions of those who retire. Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton has said she would slash the number of government contractors. Again, there are real issues that deserve real solutions rather than campaign platitudes.

Voters are eager for change. Offering reasoned solutions that can be discussed, debated and then enacted would be a welcome change.


FCW in Print

In the latest issue: Looking back on three decades of big stories in federal IT.


  • Anne Rung -- Commerce Department Photo

    Exit interview with Anne Rung

    The government's departing top acquisition official said she leaves behind a solid foundation on which to build more effective and efficient federal IT.

  • Charles Phalen

    Administration appoints first head of NBIB

    The National Background Investigations Bureau announced the appointment of its first director as the agency prepares to take over processing government background checks.

  • Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.)

    Senator: Rigid hiring process pushes millennials from federal work

    Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.) said agencies are missing out on younger workers because of the government's rigidity, particularly its protracted hiring process.

  • FCW @ 30 GPS

    FCW @ 30

    Since 1987, FCW has covered it all -- the major contracts, the disruptive technologies, the picayune scandals and the many, many people who make federal IT function. Here's a look back at six of the most significant stories.

  • Shutterstock image.

    A 'minibus' appropriations package could be in the cards

    A short-term funding bill is expected by Sept. 30 to keep the federal government operating through early December, but after that the options get more complicated.

  • Defense Secretary Ash Carter speaks at the TechCrunch Disrupt conference in San Francisco

    DOD launches new tech hub in Austin

    The DOD is opening a new Defense Innovation Unit Experimental office in Austin, Texas, while Congress debates legislation that could defund DIUx.

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