Software cements standards into health info exchanges

Health care software developer Healthvision has released an adapter that aims to help health information exchanges and applications developers more quickly adopt an interoperability framework being developed by the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) consortium.

IHE is a widely dispersed group of health care providers, associations, research organizations, vendors and government entities working on a detailed framework to wed health information technology systems and standards.

IHE’s profiles, which specify how standards can be applied to address interoperability issues, are organized by domains such as radiology, laboratory and IT infrastructure.

Healthvision’s Cloverleaf IHE Infrastructure Adaptor lets applications that are not IHE-enabled plug into IHE environments. This integration, in turn, lets health care organizations create health information exchange capabilities and reduces health application vendors’ development costs, the company said.

On the health information exchange side, Healthvision is working with CareSpark, based in Kingsport, Tenn. CareSpark has committed to a “technical architecture that supports IHE…profiles for standardized content in clinical documents,” according to the organization.

“We are acting as an IHE integration engine,” said Rey Currie, Healthvision’s vice president of product management and strategy. He said Healthvision’s software enables several of CareSpark’s older applications to communicate with the IHE infrastructure.

Currie said health information exchanges and regional health information organizations are markets for the new adapter. He said the product offers those organizations a “quick start to the IHE framework,” particularly when older applications are involved. Using Cloverleaf and the adapter, exchanges and RHIOs can deploy the IHE framework without expensive customization, he added.

Healthvision also markets its adapter to application partners that resell Cloverleaf. Currie said the adapter provides an IHE facade to applications that vendors would otherwise have to modify to be IHE native. In that way, the adapter saves vendors development effort and cost, Currie explained.

The company’s Cloverleaf IHE Infrastructure Adaptor Version2.2 works in conjunction with its Cloverleaf interface engine. The adapter supports the Cross Enterprise Document Sharing, Patient Identifier Cross Referencing, Patient Demographics Query, Basic Patient Privacy Consents, Cross Enterprise Sharing of Scanned Documents, and Audit Trail and Node Authentication profiles in IHE’s IT infrastructure domain, according to Healthvision.

About the Author

John Moore is a freelance writer based in Syracuse, N.Y.

FCW in Print

In the latest issue: Looking back on three decades of big stories in federal IT.


  • Anne Rung -- Commerce Department Photo

    Exit interview with Anne Rung

    The government's departing top acquisition official said she leaves behind a solid foundation on which to build more effective and efficient federal IT.

  • Charles Phalen

    Administration appoints first head of NBIB

    The National Background Investigations Bureau announced the appointment of its first director as the agency prepares to take over processing government background checks.

  • Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.)

    Senator: Rigid hiring process pushes millennials from federal work

    Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.) said agencies are missing out on younger workers because of the government's rigidity, particularly its protracted hiring process.

  • FCW @ 30 GPS

    FCW @ 30

    Since 1987, FCW has covered it all -- the major contracts, the disruptive technologies, the picayune scandals and the many, many people who make federal IT function. Here's a look back at six of the most significant stories.

  • Shutterstock image.

    A 'minibus' appropriations package could be in the cards

    A short-term funding bill is expected by Sept. 30 to keep the federal government operating through early December, but after that the options get more complicated.

  • Defense Secretary Ash Carter speaks at the TechCrunch Disrupt conference in San Francisco

    DOD launches new tech hub in Austin

    The DOD is opening a new Defense Innovation Unit Experimental office in Austin, Texas, while Congress debates legislation that could defund DIUx.

Reader comments

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

More from 1105 Public Sector Media Group