Chertoff joins Covington law firm

Former Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff has joined the Covington and Burling LLP law firm’s Washington, D.C., office as senior of counsel, the firm announced on March 26. He will work in the white-collar defense and investigations group.

Chertoff was named to the top homeland security post by President George W. Bush in January 2005, replacing former Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Ridge. The department opened in March 2003 as a conglomeration of 22 federal agencies and 180,000 employees. Chertoff took on leadership of major programs including airport security, border security, Real ID Act and disaster preparedness and response.

Chertoff served from 2003 to 2005 as a federal judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. He previously served as the Assistant Attorney General for the Criminal Division of the Justice Department, where he oversaw the investigation of the 2001 terrorist attacks and formed the Enron Task Force.

Chertoff, who graduated from Harvard College and Harvard Law School, also served more than a decade as a federal prosecutor, including as U.S. Attorney for the District of New Jersey. He will work in Covington's white-collar defense and investigations group.

“Mike Chertoff is first and foremost a lawyer of considerable renown. His legal and public service, including his crisis management experience, make him a unique asset for senior executives,” Bruce Baird, chair of Covington’s white-collar practice, said in the release. “Mike is uniquely qualified to help executives who must understand and manage issues that have national, cross-border, legal and public policy implications.”

“What attracted me to Covington was the firm’s international reach, impressive list of clients, and collegial atmosphere,” Chertoff said in a statement. “I am looking forward to working with clients that face complex criminal and regulatory enforcement investigations, and other forms of legal crisis.”




About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

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