DHS seeks nuclear detection research

The Homeland Security Department plans to award $3 million this summer for nuclear detection technology exploratory research that could lead to a dramatic improvement in the country's nuclear detection capabilities, the department said.

DHS has published a Broad Agency Announcement as part of its exploratory research program to develop new nuclear material detection technologies. The Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO), which runs the program, anticipates making multiple awards under the program, according to the solicitation first published March 25 and updated April 9. Interested parties must submit white papers by April 15. Full proposals are due June 5. DHS expects to make the awards during the summer.

The DNDO works to make sure the country is safe from the illegal importation, development or purchase of nuclear or radiological devices.

According to the solicitation, DHS is interested in technology that involves detection materials, passive and active detection technologies and forensics. The department said it prefers comprehensive program proposal that may include elements of scientific theory, modeling, simulation, experiment investigations, algorithm development and other parts of applied research that could lead to a proof-of-concept demonstration.

The competition is open to private industry, nonprofit organizations and academic institutions. Those organizations are encouraged to partner with the national laboratories, federally funded research and development centers and national agencies. However, those organizations can’t submit proposals to be prime contractors, DHS said.


About the Author

Ben Bain is a reporter for Federal Computer Week.

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Reader comments

Mon, Aug 1, 2011

Doesn't defense department already contract out to do this? Doesn't NNSA's mission for nuclear nonproliferation, which aided Japen nuclear cleanup effort do this also? Why is DHS duplicating missions?

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