NIH preparing small business GWAC for IT services

Contract will cover 10 task areas, including biomedical and health care IT support

The National Institutes of Health is preparing a solicitation for a small business contract  to buy a broad variety of information technology services for health care and biomedical research.

The NIH Information Technology Acquisition and Assessment Center posted a draft request for proposals on Nov. 16 on the Federal Business Opportunities Web site for a small business set-aside governmentwide acquisition contract.

The contract would be among the successors to two current GWACs expiring in December 2010: the Chief Information Officer-Solutions and Partners 2 Innovations (CIO-SP2i) and to the Image World 2 New Dimensions. Vendors are invited to provide comment on the draft RFP by Nov. 30.

The government is not soliciting proposals from vendors at this time. However, the agency will consider comments for developing the final RFP for the CIO-SP3 Small Business set-aside GWAC.

The procurement vehicle will cover 10 task areas, including support for bioinformatics, electronic health records and the Federal Health Architecture. Details on each of the task areas are published in the 137-page statement of work.

The 10 areas are IT services for biomedical research and health care; chief information officer support; imaging; outsourcing support; IT operations and maintenance; integration services; critical infrastructure protection and information assurance; digital government services; enterprise management systems and software development.

NIH has several other IT projects in the works. The National Cancer Institute recently advertised for an informatics expert to harmonize cancer data, and the National Library of Medicine is distributing a mapping tool to standardize electronic health data.

About the Author

Alice Lipowicz is a staff writer covering government 2.0, homeland security and other IT policies for Federal Computer Week.

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Reader comments

Fri, Nov 20, 2009 Steve Bethesda, Maryland

Small Businesses need easy access to the government and vice versa. Why make them bid yet again to provide IT services on a governmentwide basis? This is costly for both sides (AND the taxpayer). Alliant Small Business provides all that the government needs and NIH can use it too. Keep in mind, Alliant Small Business is flexible enough for NIH or even the Air Force for that matter to put it's own special stink on any task order RFP they may want to issue. Come to think of it, Why does NITAAC need to issue CIO-SP3? It's just a deadweight waste when Alliant is already in place and can cover anything NITAAC would want to do with their own version of Alliant. Is there no adult leadership in federal acquisition right now? Or is it every bureaucracy for itself.

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