Buzz Factor

The most-read stories on FCW.com for the past two weeks

1. 4 reasons why managers resist telework — and why they might be wrong

Summary: Management experts discuss the flaws in common objections to telework, such as the inadequacy of home offices and the lack of employee visibility.

Outlook: The objectors and the contrarians each make good points; necessity will breed invention.

2. Mythbuster: Federal workers not overpaid, senator

Summary: Sen. Ted Kaufman (D-Del.) rebuts a recent report that federal employees make more money than their private-sector counterparts.

Outlook: The senator, successor and longtime staff aide to Vice President Joseph Biden, did his homework. But the debate rages on.

3. 5 critical steps on the road to IPv6

Summary: Agencies need to move deliberately to upgrade their infrastructure for IPv6 so they don't miss out on new features of the global Internet.

Outlook: The situation is going to become urgent soon, so the feds can't dillydally.

4. 7 BlackBerry tricks from the pros (but what's missing?)

Summary: Did you know you can navigate your BlackBerry faster by using built-in keyboard shortcuts? We show you the most helpful ones, along with six other tips.

Outlook: Your thumbs will thank you.

5. Game changer: DOD rewrites its book on acquisition strategy

Summary: Defense Secretary Robert Gates has an elaborate set of proposals for reforming acquisition at the Defense Department. Some are more realistic than others.

Outlook: There’s a big difference between issuing proposals and making them reality. DOD’s leaders can expect some stiff resistance along the way.

6. New DOD acquisition strategy sparks debate

Summary: As details of Defense Department leaders' proposed acquisition reforms emerge, critics begin to object to various aspects.

Outlook: If Gates and Pentagon acquisition chief Ashton Carter stick to their guns, expect a lengthy debate on the topic.

7. TSA may have a solution for virtual-striptease body scans

Summary: New software for airport body scanners replaces near-naked images of travelers with avatars that reveal contraband but not intimate body parts.

Outlook: Privacy advocates should be satisfied — if the technology works well. It’s still being tested.

8. GSA may recompete HSPD-12 contract

Summary: The General Services Administration's inspector general says the competition for a services contract didn't fully comply with acquisition policy, and GSA officials might choose to conduct the competition all over again.

Outlook: It isn’t clear that a new competition would lead to any change in outcome, but GSA officials are considering some contract changes if they do go ahead with a new solicitation.

 

About the Author

Technology journalist Michael Hardy is a former FCW editor.

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