State CIOs choose new leadership group

New NASCIO president is Kyle Schafer, CTO of West Virginia

The National Association of State CIOs, meeting in Miami, has elected its incoming Executive Committee, which will be led by new NASCIO president Kyle Schafer, West Virginia's chief technology officer.

Schafer, who will serve as president for the 2010-2011 program year, succeeds Utah CIO Stephen Fletcher, who was president for the 2009-2010 program year.

The other new officers are:

  • Vice President Dugan Petty, CIO, Oregon.
  • Secretary-Treasurer Brenda Decker, CIO, Nebraska.
  • Past-President Stephen Fletcher, CIO, Utah.

Incoming directors, who serve two-year terms, are:

  • Dick Clark, CIO, Montana.
  • Adel Ebeid, CTO, New Jersey.
  • Chad Kirkpatrick, CIO, Arizona.
  • Greg Wass, CIO, Illinois.

Returning NASCIO Executive Committee members are Claire Bailey, Arkansas CTO; Mark Bengel, Tennessee CIO; and Otto Doll, South Dakota CIO.

The new leaders took office Sept. 27.

NASCIO is a national network and resource organization for state CIOs and an advocate for technology policy at all levels of government.

About the Author

David Hubler is the former print managing editor for GCN and senior editor for Washington Technology. He is freelance writer living in Annandale, Va.

Featured

  • Cybersecurity

    DHS floats 'collective defense' model for cybersecurity

    Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen wants her department to have a more direct role in defending the private sector and critical infrastructure entities from cyberthreats.

  • Defense
    Defense Secretary James Mattis testifies at an April 12 hearing of the House Armed Services Committee.

    Mattis: Cloud deal not tailored for Amazon

    On Capitol Hill, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis sought to quell "rumors" that the Pentagon's planned single-award cloud acquisition was designed with Amazon Web Services in mind.

  • Census
    shutterstock image

    2020 Census to include citizenship question

    The Department of Commerce is breaking with recent practice and restoring a question about respondent citizenship last used in 1950, despite being urged not to by former Census directors and outside experts.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.