NASA laughs off comet fears

A comet that some doomsayers had warned was going to cause big changes on Earth will in fact pass harmlessly by.

So says NASA anyway, which may not ease the fears of comet believers.

Geekosystem reports that comet Elenin, which is predicted to have its closest approach to Earth on Oct. 16, stirred apocalyptic end-times rumors, including the theory that NASA has engaged in a coverup about a potential "brown dwarf" effect from its passage that could change the course of celestial objects. Some believe that Elenin has already caused major earthquakes, which have been progressively stronger as the comet nears our world.

The space agency set out to debunk such theories by issuing a press release. In it, NASA noted that the relatively small size of Comet Elenin and its distance from the Earth — it won't get any closer than 22 million miles away — make its upcoming passage pretty  much a nonevent that will have "immeasurably minuscule influence on our planet."

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Reader comments

Thu, Nov 10, 2011 Robert MD

Actually NASA spends a great deal of money defending space ships from BB sized objects. If that BB was traveling at 150,000 miles a second I am sure you would be moved by the impact. No worries, only a BB but it sure can destroy you and the space craft. So yes, the bowling ball would be moved and cracked into small pieces depending on volicity - DO THE MATH

Mon, Aug 22, 2011

For those doomsday conspiracy theorists - all you have to do is look up the orbital parameters and calculate the gravitational effects. That's assuming any of them know how to do math. If one fires a BB past a bowling ball, does the bowling ball move. I don't think so.

Fri, Aug 19, 2011

I doubt it is comforting for most to hear that NASA (the agency that is said to be secretly suppressing information) comes out and laughs it off.

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