Shutdown averted in the nick of time -- again

President Barack Obama has signed legislation that will provide nearly $130 billion in continued funding to some federal agencies through the 2012 fiscal year, and to the rest of the government through Dec. 16.

The continuing resolution was included in a “mini-bus,” which provides approximately $130 billion for fiscal 2012 for the departments of Agriculture, Transportation, Commerce, Justice and Housing and Urban Development. The bill also provides budgets for smaller agencies such as NASA, the Food and Drug Administration and the National Science Foundation.

The bill fund the rest of the government only through Dec. 16. Congress is working on fiscal 2012 budgets for other agencies.

The House approved the bill with a 298-121 vote and the Senate in a vote 70-30, both on Nov. 17, only a day before the deadline when funds were set to expire.

Obama, who is currently in Indonesia attending a summit, directed that a machine imprint of his signature be used to sign the legislation, an administration official said, according to The Wall Street Journal. 

The signing averts the fourth threatened government shutdown of 2011.

About the Author

Camille Tuutti is a former FCW staff writer who covered federal oversight and the workforce.

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Reader comments

Mon, Nov 21, 2011 PD

What is this world coming to, what has to happen before this pathetic mess is straightened out! Come on people!

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