Oversight

IG: Coast Guard needs improved laptop security

Coast Guardsman using laptop

LeTroy Burgess records buoy-station data in Baltimore Harbor in this photo from 2011. (Coast Guard photo by Tasha Tully)

The Coast Guard needs to improve its laptop security through more diligent inventory management and restricting the purchase of non-standard laptops, a report by the Homeland Security Department's Inspector General found.

Some of USCG’s reported 15,000 laptops don’t meet the service's own security standards, while its procedures for implementing security patches and other measures required by the Department of Homeland Security have deficiencies.

"The use of laptop computers with built-in wireless Internet features has increased the mobility and productivity of the Federal workforce," the report said. "However, the popularity of laptops has also increased the risk of theft and unauthorized disclosure of sensitive data at Federal agencies."

The IG's recommendations include resolving incompatibility of some applications and implementing procedures to ensure data is either erased or unreadable when necessary.

USCG officials concurred with all seven recommendations. Click here to download the report.

About the Author

Reid Davenport is an FCW editorial fellow. Connect with him on Twitter: @ReidDavenport.

Featured

  • Cybersecurity

    DHS floats 'collective defense' model for cybersecurity

    Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen wants her department to have a more direct role in defending the private sector and critical infrastructure entities from cyberthreats.

  • Defense
    Defense Secretary James Mattis testifies at an April 12 hearing of the House Armed Services Committee.

    Mattis: Cloud deal not tailored for Amazon

    On Capitol Hill, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis sought to quell "rumors" that the Pentagon's planned single-award cloud acquisition was designed with Amazon Web Services in mind.

  • Census
    shutterstock image

    2020 Census to include citizenship question

    The Department of Commerce is breaking with recent practice and restoring a question about respondent citizenship last used in 1950, despite being urged not to by former Census directors and outside experts.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.