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Tangherlini touts GSA's ability to boost efficiency

Dan Tangherlini

GSA's newly confirmed permanent administrator is vowing to redouble the agency's efforts to bring its resources and expertise to bear for partner agencies in building a smarter, more efficient government.

In a July 10 post on the GSA Blog, agency administrator Dan Tangherlini said he had attended a key July 8 meeting with White House cabinet and senior officials to discuss how to make the federal government more efficient and effective during President Barack Obama's second term.

During that meeting Obama said he planned to make innovation in government management a second-term priority, and tapped Sylvia Mathews Burwell, director of the Office of Management and Budget, to lead the effort.

Obama also gave agency leaders the goal of developing an "aggressive management agenda" to harness technology to bring innovations in government services to the public. As examples of first-term innovations, he cited the open-data initiative, the ongoing effort to reduce federal data center redundancies, and the use of satellite and Internet technologies aid relief efforts after natural disasters.

In his July 10 post, Tangherlini said GSA is in a unique position to help produce efficiencies and value for agencies in acquisition, real estate and technology services.

In the acquisition arena, he said, federal agencies have saved more than $300 million though GSA's Strategic Sourcing Initiative since the program began in 2010. Additionally, he said, FedRAMP, the single security authorization for cloud technologies for all participating agencies, has reduced costs, time and staff once needed to conduct redundant security assessments.

"In the coming months, we will be redoubling our efforts to demonstrate to our partner agencies how GSA's existing resources and expertise can support the president's management goals and allow them to focus their staff and their funding on their important missions," Tangherlini said.

"GSA knows how to use the size and the scope of the federal government to drive down costs, increase collaboration and efficiency. We are committed to building the kind of responsive and effective government that president Obama has challenged us to create."

About the Author

Mark Rockwell is a staff writer at FCW.

Before joining FCW, Rockwell was Washington correspondent for Government Security News, where he covered all aspects of homeland security from IT to detection dogs and border security. Over the last 25 years in Washington as a reporter, editor and correspondent, he has covered an increasingly wide array of high-tech issues for publications like Communications Week, Internet Week, Fiber Optics News, tele.com magazine and Wireless Week.

Rockwell received a Jesse H. Neal Award for his work covering telecommunications issues, and is a graduate of James Madison University.

Click here for previous articles by Rockwell. Contact him at mrockwell@fcw.com or follow him on Twitter at @MRockwell4.


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Reader comments

Sun, Jul 14, 2013 Jaime Gracia Washington, D.C.

Until Mr. Tangherlini either allows others in government or industry to help participate in the findings and review the methodology, I just view these pronouncements as propaganda. I know I have been stymied at efforts to communicate with GSA and OMB (OFPP specifically), as they stated they are using Google Analytics for data analysis. That in and of itself is a major problem, as Google Analytics, a great product, does not have the firepower to mine or create the meaningful data to capture duplication and redundancy across the federal government. Further, GAO analyzed the savings from strategic sourcing against what GSA was claiming, and had a vastly different, and smaller number just using FPDS-NG data. Although GSA was at the forefront of Better Buying Power and Mythbusters, it seems that when it comes to sharing data, transparency is an inconvenience.

Thu, Jul 11, 2013

Efficiency? When we are ordered to use GSA to buy batteries at 3X the cost of of a local provider who unlike GSA will deliver the next day at no extra charge to our doorstep AND remove the old batteries, again with no effort on our part or cost to the taxpayer? Of course, I may be focusing on the wrong part of GSA, but that is a bias from being in the trenches.

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