GovTV

Video: Are you smarter than a dinosaur?

It appears that the sky is not the limit for federal crowdsourcing initiatives. NASA plans to blast out $35,000 over the next six months to citizen scientists who can help them better their asteroid detection, and has a new video to recruit participants:

The Asteroid Data Hunter contest, which began March 17, seeks algorithms to detect and acquire information about celestial missiles that might approach Earth. NASA hopes someone can come up with a formula that increases detection sensitivity and minimizes the number of false positives, while also ignoring imperfections in the data.

"The dinosaurs would've cared if they'd known" about the dangers of earth-threatening asteroids, the video's narrator notes. "Let's be smarter than them."

“For the past three years, NASA has been learning and advancing the ability to leverage distributed algorithm and coding skills through the NASA Tournament Lab to solve tough problems," NASA Tournament Lab Director Jason Crusan said in a statement. "We are now applying our experience with algorithm contests to helping protect the planet from asteroid threats through image analysis.”

About the Author

Reid Davenport is an FCW editorial fellow. Connect with him on Twitter: @ReidDavenport.

Featured

  • Cybersecurity

    DHS floats 'collective defense' model for cybersecurity

    Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen wants her department to have a more direct role in defending the private sector and critical infrastructure entities from cyberthreats.

  • Defense
    Defense Secretary James Mattis testifies at an April 12 hearing of the House Armed Services Committee.

    Mattis: Cloud deal not tailored for Amazon

    On Capitol Hill, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis sought to quell "rumors" that the Pentagon's planned single-award cloud acquisition was designed with Amazon Web Services in mind.

  • Census
    shutterstock image

    2020 Census to include citizenship question

    The Department of Commerce is breaking with recent practice and restoring a question about respondent citizenship last used in 1950, despite being urged not to by former Census directors and outside experts.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.