Editor's Note

Fixating on failure

(Image: Shutterstock)

There was no shortage of interesting discussions at ACT-IAC's recent Management of Change conference. Does agile development really work at agency scale? Should the government ever serve as its own systems integrator? Do federal workplaces have what it takes to attract and retain young talent? And what, in a large and regulation-bound organization, does it take to truly innovate?

Perhaps the most important question, though, cut across all those conversations: Why is everyone so afraid to fail?

I'm not talking about failure at the level of HealthCare.gov or the Expeditionary Combat Support System. No institution, public or private, can afford to let critical projects run off the rails at that scale. But many feds avoid risking even the tiniest misstep or paper over smaller failings until they produce truly serious problems that can no longer be ignored.

There are legitimate reasons for risk aversion, of course. Government is held to a different standard. The "waste" of a single taxpayer dollar can be construed as a career-ending offense, and plenty of politicians are happy to rake agencies over the coals. Silicon Valley reveres bold experiments that don't pan out, but inspectors general can see them as reckless disregard for process and prudence. And there are still pockets of the federal workforce where "why try?" attitudes can beat down would-be innovators.

And yes, there is the media. One particularly candid conversation at the conference focused on the press' fixation with failure and why successes so rarely make it to the headlines. Shouldn't the Department of Veterans Affairs' impressive progress on clearing its claims backlog get coverage alongside the allegations of "secret lists" and delayed treatment?

It's a fair question. FCW does better than most in covering both the problems and their fixes, but we ignore our fair share of "isn't this great?" stories. That's not inherent negativity, however; it's a desire to help the federal IT community learn and improve. It's not just that stories of problems identified and addressed make for better reads. Failing fast is the best way to get better -- in agile development and in life. We're trying to share those lessons more broadly and learn from our own mistakes in the process.

About the Author

Troy K. Schneider is editor-in-chief of FCW and GCN.

Prior to joining 1105 Media in 2012, Schneider was the New America Foundation’s Director of Media & Technology, and before that was Managing Director for Electronic Publishing at the Atlantic Media Company. The founding editor of NationalJournal.com, Schneider also helped launch the political site PoliticsNow.com in the mid-1990s, and worked on the earliest online efforts of the Los Angeles Times and Newsday. He began his career in print journalism, and has written for a wide range of publications, including The New York Times, WashingtonPost.com, Slate, Politico, National Journal, Governing, and many of the other titles listed above.

Schneider is a graduate of Indiana University, where his emphases were journalism, business and religious studies.

Click here for previous articles by Schneider, or connect with him on Twitter: @troyschneider.


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Reader comments

Tue, Jun 17, 2014

One of the issues many of us have with main stream media, failure no matter how minor and at times irrelevant to the big picture is big news while success is a "ho-hum slow news day" filler. (Granted, not always true, but seems like it at times.)

Nice to see an editor admit that is an issue in our system but unfortunately published in an arena of "small" (although mostly technical) readership.

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