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Call for all applicants: DIA needs a CIO

help wanted sign

Can you or someone you know affect strategic change -- or foster “creative tension” -- within an agency? Quickly ascertain "the internal and external politics that impact the work of the organization?" Oh, and carry Top Secret/SCI clearance? If so, the Defense Intelligence Agency might be interested in speaking with you as it searches for a new CIO.

The successful applicant could earn up to $181,500 a year.

DIA has cast itself as a catalyst for innovation in the intelligence community, with Director Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn urging an overhaul of how the agency cultivates ideas and technology. The CIO will undoubtedly be part of those efforts.

Of course, there is the small matter that DIA has a CIO -- Grant Schneider, a career employee, has held that job since 2007. Schneider is out of the office this week, and an agency spokesman could not provide details on the reason for or timing of Schneider's presumed departure.

In any case, those hoping to be the next CIO had better move quickly -- applications are being accepted only through July 25.

Posted by Sean Lyngaas on Jul 16, 2014 at 12:37 PM


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Reader comments

Fri, Aug 1, 2014 iknowthisisursite

That is precisely why...that promoting from within will ultimately lead tovfailurr. Not only for DISA, but for associated and intra-agency conflicts and failures. Some fed requirements are so antiquated they are useless. Furthermore, this strategycof promotingveithin shrinks thecdimensions of the box, a head of agency must think out of. Sorry for negativity, however it is what itcis. Promote a 31yr old super intelligent and feel secure. Me...rather go for the highly educated andcexperienced thru life to be the leader. You people have multiple agency problems so significant, it truly is downright scary. No one thinks maverick, or out of yhe box...thereforre think of what will be in the future. Trust me, I have very receent experience dealing ... as a civilian ,.. with a severe us and five eyes national plus security breach of sensitive military data. NSA Dia Dhs knows...they redacted all 6 media shots sent. Never bothered to commence investigsations, etc. Coverup still in progress...resourses and time spent enormous. Good luck.

Mon, Jul 21, 2014 Jake Mischbuccha

There is absolutely no evidence to suggest that this job is "wired." Why would you ever think that, eh? Someone does have to explain why the incumbent is in place, though. Perhaps he is a candidate.

Fri, Jul 18, 2014

I suspect this may be an in-house promotion. For some reason, the feds feel compelled to publically advertise a job even when everyone knows it's just a formality and only intended to promote the incumbent.

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