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The 12-word social media policy

As federal agencies struggle with social media policies that can facilitate a flow of information without tarnishing an agency's public image, a blogger from the health care industry offers 12 magic words that might do the trick. They even rhyme, creating an aid to memorization.

Dr. Farris Timimi, medical director for the Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media, proposed the 12-word social media policy in a blog post on April 5. It might help feds because, like agencies, health care organizations deal with sensitive information, rules regarding disclosure of information and a need to protect their reputations.

The 12 words are:

Don't lie, don't pry,

Don't cheat, can't delete,

Don't steal, don't reveal.

To read Dr. Timimi's more detailed explanation of what these six two-word directives entail, click here to read his blog.

Posted by Michael Hardy on Apr 26, 2012 at 12:18 PM


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Reader comments

Sun, Apr 29, 2012 bugeek Boston

You can tell it's not from a fed, it's under 250 pages.

Fri, Apr 27, 2012

this would be so much better if it were written as a haiku.

Fri, Apr 27, 2012 Jason S.

Using George Carlin's 10 commandments bit as point of reference for the power of combining ideas and boiling them down to their core meaning along with subscribing to the idea that the word "don't" has a polar opposite affect, I submit the following replacement. Be truthful, show restraint, it's permanent While my replacement lacks a poetic rhyme, it does invoke more powerful language which, in my experience, invokes powerful action.

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