Management Watch

Blog archive

What’s the future like for CIOs?

I recently attended an event where I heard someone say CIOs’ days are numbered. It wasn’t really news to me: That whole concept of CIOs, particularly in government, having a short lifespan dates back to oh, forever.

When CIO first emerged on the scene, people weren’t exactly agog. They used to say CIO meant Career Is Over. For government CIOs, that statements holds some truth.  While former Justice Department CIO Vance Hitch held his position for nearly a decade, making him the longest-serving CIO in government, the average tenure for CIOs is two years.

The nation’s first U.S. CIO, Vivek Kundra, made it 2.5 years before he threw in the towel and handed over the reins to former Microsoft exec Steven VanRoekel. Others who have passed the two-year marker are VA CIO Roger Baker and DHS CIO Richard Spires, who were both appointed in 2009.

But the notion that CIOs would completely vanish is just rubbish, according to an article on CIO.com. CIOs’ roles and responsibilities may change drastically, but they’ll still be around, the story titled "10 Predictions for What the CIO Role Will Look Like in 2020" points out.

In 2012, CIOs will, for example, not have a traditional IT department. With the march to the cloud and rapid advancements in technology, IT departments will move from being a physical entities that manages cloud services to a cloud service itself, the article notes.

Future CIOs will also see a dip in the number of employees they manage. Instead, the future will usher in more autonomous computing that relies less on human intervention for systems to operate correctly.

To read the rest of the story, head over to CIO.com.

Posted by Camille Tuutti on May 04, 2012 at 12:19 PM


The Fed 100

Read the profiles of all this year's winners.

Featured

  • Then-presidential candidate Donald Trump at a 2016 campaign event. Image: Shutterstock

    'Buy American' order puts procurement in the spotlight

    Some IT contractors are worried that the "buy American" executive order from President Trump could squeeze key innovators out of the market.

  • OMB chief Mick Mulvaney, shown here in as a member of Congress in 2013. (Photo credit Gage Skidmore/Flickr)

    White House taps old policies for new government makeover

    New guidance from OMB advises agencies to use shared services, GWACs and federal schedules for acquisition, and to leverage IT wherever possible in restructuring plans.

  • Shutterstock image (by Everett Historical): aerial of the Pentagon.

    What DOD's next CIO will have to deal with

    It could be months before the Defense Department has a new CIO, and he or she will face a host of organizational and operational challenges from Day One

  • USAF Gen. John Hyten

    General: Cyber Command needs new platform before NSA split

    U.S. Cyber Command should be elevated to a full combatant command as soon as possible, the head of Strategic Command told Congress, but it cannot be separated from the NSA until it has its own cyber platform.

  • Image from Shutterstock.

    DLA goes virtual

    The Defense Logistics Agency is in the midst of an ambitious campaign to eliminate its IT infrastructure and transition to using exclusively shared, hosted and virtual services.

  • Fed 100 logo

    The 2017 Federal 100

    The women and men who make up this year's Fed 100 are proof positive of what one person can make possibile in federal IT. Read on to learn more about each and every winner's accomplishments.

Reader comments

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

More from 1105 Public Sector Media Group