SPSS ships for Windows 95

SPSS Inc. last month began shipping a Microsoft Corp. Windows 95 version of its statistical software.

SPSS 7.0 for Windows is available on SPSS' General Services Administration schedule, the Immigration and Naturalization Service's Personal Workstation Acquisition Contract through Telos Corp., and the Defense Department's Integration for Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Intelligence (IC4I) contract through Electronic Data Systems Corp. EDS is a subcontractor to BTG Inc. on IC4I.

In addition, SPSS plans to add its Windows 95 product to BTG Inc.'s Systems Acquisition Support Services contract. SPSS does about 15 percent of its business with government customers.

SPSS 7.0 for Windows offers a library of ready-made formats called TableLooks, which allow users to more quickly create tables. Other features include pivot tables that allow users to reorganize tables to view their results from different angles. The tables can be moved to other applications or the Windows 95 desktop through SPSS' implementation of Microsoft's OLE 2.0.

In addition, SPSS 7.0 for Windows supports Microsoft's Open Database Connectivity (ODBC), which allows users to import statistics from ODBC-compliant database sources.

Mark Dobner, federal systems manager with SPSS, said the new product will find a number of government uses. He cited Government Performance and Results Act compliance as one potential area of activity.

"The government has been forced to measure outcomes of programs in order to have those programs continue to be funded," Dobner said. "When they do start measuring and collecting data, that's where SPSS fits in."

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