LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

I read the article "Librarians: Various platforms needed to give public access" [FCW, June 24] and have seemed to develop a bad taste.

While the story is OK, I think the individual being interviewed is a sophomore when it comes to understanding public needs. In the first place, he underestimates the direction the public is heading; second, he misrepresents the educational system by indicating people will not be familiar with the technology. Third, the 11 percent only represents the United States giving no credit to other nations researching our databases for up-to-date, near-real-time data; fourth, he degrades educated people, those who want to be educated and the educational system by saying the all-important information should not be there or made available to the general public; fifth, if more technical information were put on the Internet, more of us would read it instead of thinking of it as superficial or shallow. It does have a lot of bells and whistles.

What he (the interviewee) is saying is that he wants to control what we want, what we want to read and what we want as resource data. It reminds me of the giant cyclotron in Texas - removed from science for political reasons.

What disturbs me is the lack of rebuttals by real educators.

Next time, get someone who is real.

Bud Willner

Vienna, Va.

Editor's reply: The story in question covered hearings held by Congress on public access to government documents. The individuals quoted were testifying before Congress and were selected by the committee staff. Several individuals with differing points of view were represented in the hearing and in the article reporting on the hearing.

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