ROSTER

The Navy's first "Internet recruit," Operations Spc. Alan Shepherd, has completed his training and last month reported to his first assignment, the USS Curts, a fast frigate based in Yokuska, Japan. Shepherd was the first recruit to send in an electronic-mail response to a Navy on-line recruiting effort.

Senior Chief Machinists Mate Norman Cowen of the Navy Recruiting Station, Salinas, Calif., who answered Shepherd's e-mail, said of his recruit: "He's a real computer geek. Every time I was at his house, he'd show me something else on his computer."

David D. Clark has been appointed chairman of the National Research Council's Computer Science and Telecommunications Board for a three-year term. A senior research scientist with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Laboratory for Computer Science, Clark has been a board member for the past year. Clark replaces William A. Wulf, who recently became interim director of the National Academy of Engineering.

Skysat Communications Corp. named retired Air Force Gen. Buster Glosson vice chairman of the board. Glosson was architect of the Persian Gulf War air campaign and served as deputy chief of staff of plans and operations for the Air Force. Skysat plans to develop and operate a fleet of airships operating at an altitude of 70,000 feet to serve as telecommunications relay platforms.

Eastman Kodak Co. said its Commercial and Government Systems unit named Joanne Braeunle manager for planning and administration. Braeunle, who previously managed a Kodak organization that produced custom digital and photographic products for government customers, has 15 years of experience with the company working on government imaging products and programs.

Lockheed Martin Corp. named Robert Stevens president of its Air Traffic Management Division. He succeeds Robert Welte, who will work on special projects for Lockheed Martin.

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