Air Force Net woes

I read the Intercepts item "SSG Web snafu" from the July 29 issue of Federal Computer Week. It seems the information you received is in error. On July 24 at approximately 0300 hours EST the big "I" had its A-Server Domain Name Server or DNS crash as a result of human error. This caused a catalytic domino effect throughout the entire world. The naming tables that normally receive updates from this router were unable to update their own DNS tables. Systematically the same occurred from many DNS hosts in the family tree all the way up to the A-Server. The Network Information Center accepted responsibility for the problem and had it corrected within minutes however the cascade effect occurred on many boxes - including the Air Force DNS - in the family until the DNS server recovered.

The other reference Mr. Brewin made was to an internal source concerning the SSG's slow response time while leaving our base LAN. Again the facts are not correct. There is no holdup leaving the SSG LAN. Our throughput never reaches the capacity of our pipes. The problem exists beyond our (AFIN) networks. We do not control the connections to the big "I." The Air Force Wide Area Network connects via DOD-level Internet at several locations to the commercial big "I" provider and it is at these undersize interfaces that the delays occur.

I hope the clarification of Mr. Brewin's article enlightens some of the readers as to the root cause of the problems. Do not hesitate to check with SSG if further clarification is ever necessary on our problems. We pride ourselves on making sure our customers get great service and accurate information.vCol. William F. ParaskaDirectorInformation Transport SystemsAir Force

Bob Brewin notes:

Despite placing calls to three different parts of SSG before printing the story we did not receive a return call.

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