GSA brokers AT&T, IRS deal

The General Services Administration's Federal Telecommunications Service late last week brokered a deal between the Internal Revenue Service and AT&T to ensure that the company will correct problems encountered in switching the Treasury Department's FTS 2000 network traffic from Sprint to AT&T.

John Okay deputy commissioner at FTS said the agreement "spells out a number of steps AT&T will take to correct deficiencies in 800 service quality as well as reporting and trouble-handling procedures." Okay said the agreement will require AT&T to commit the maximum resources necessary until the problems are overcome.

"AT&T needs to step up and do that " Okay said. "We're cautiously optimistic that AT&T has come to realize the extent of customer concerns and has agreed to respond to those concerns."

Okay said the significance of the agreement lies in its explicit definitions of what actions the government expects from AT&T. He said it also represents a "more solid" commitment from the company.

The agreement was signed by GSA acting administrator David Barram. The agreement was faxed to AT&T last Friday for concurrence Okay said.

Featured

  • Defense
    Ryan D. McCarthy being sworn in as Army Secretary Oct. 10, 2019. (Photo credit: Sgt. Dana Clarke/U.S. Army)

    Army wants to spend nearly $1B on cloud, data by 2025

    Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy said lack of funding or a potential delay in the JEDI cloud bid "strikes to the heart of our concern."

  • Congress
    Rep. Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) at the Hack the Capitol conference Sept. 20, 2018

    Jim Langevin's view from the Hill

    As chairman of of the Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committe and a member of the House Homeland Security Committee, Rhode Island Democrat Jim Langevin is one of the most influential voices on cybersecurity in Congress.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.