Gateway 2000 unveils new high-end notebook

Gateway 2000 Inc. will announce today a new high-end multimedia notebook that is the industry's first to provide TV-quality video in and out of the system and offers more video RAM than any other notebook on the market.

The Solo 9100 also features a 13.3-inch XGA active-matrix display two universal system bus ports and a combo CD-ROM/floppy disk drive.

With support for Zoomed Video and memory expansion up to 164M the Solo 9100 will be one of the highest- performing multimedia notebooks available to government buyers.

Gateway 2000 officials said the Solo 9100 meets the Trade Agreements Act and the Buy American rules and will be added to the General Services Administration schedule this month.

One advantage for government buyers is that the Solo 9100 will use the same components including power supplies and docking stations as all the other Gateway Solo notebooks. The Solo 9100 also features Intel Corp.'s MMO processor module which can easily be upgraded with faster processors.

Price Points

A 166 MHz Pentium MMX system with 64M of RAM 4M of VRAM a 3G hard drive a 13.3-inch display a 10X CD-ROM/floppy drive a 33.3 kilobit/sec modem Wavetable sound built-in speakers and two batteries will sell for $5 995 retail.

A 150 MHz Pentium MMX system with 24M of RAM 4M of VRAM a 2G hard drive a 13.3-inch display a 10X CD-ROM/floppy drive a 33.3 kilobit/sec modem Wavetable sound built-in speakers and one battery will sell for $4 799 retail. Both systems come with Windows 95 Office 97 and a carrying case.

Gateway 2000 uses a build-to-order approach so government customers can choose from a broad range of configurations and options for the Solo 9100.

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